Sunday, July 31, 2005

Purple Lilac - State Flower of New Hampshire

It was introduced to England some 300 years ago where it became a garden favorite. New Hampshire historian Leon Anderson writes in To This Day that the purple lilac was first imported from England and planted at the Portsmouth home of Governor Benning Wentworth in 1750. "New Hampshire Revised Statute Annotated (RSA) 3:5 Anderson, Leon. Flower -- Tree -- Bird"

This image is not copyrighted and may be freely used for any purpose. Please credit the artist, original publication if applicable, and the USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database. The following format is suggested and will be appreciated:

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E. et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook. USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee; NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Admin., Bismarck, ND.
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Kingdom Plantae – Plants, Subkingdom Tracheobionta – Vascular plants, Superdivision Spermatophyta – Seed plants, Division Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants, Class Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons, Subclass Asteridae –, Order Scrophulariales –, Family Oleaceae – Olive family, Genus Syringa L. – lilac, Species Syringa vulgaris L. – common lilac.

Herman, D.E. et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook. USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee; NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Admin., Bismarck, ND. Courtesy of ND State Soil Conservation Committee. Provided by USDA NRCS ND State Office. ND.The Purple Lilac (Syringa vulgaris)was named the state flower of New Hampshire in 1919. The "common lilac" in native to eastern Europe. While it will grow in common soil it prefers rich soil and full sun.

Text Reference: USDA-NRCS. 2005. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

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Saturday, July 30, 2005

White Hawthorn Blossom - State Flower of Missouri

Plant seeds in fall in ordinary soil, they may not germinate unti, the second year. The native Hawthorn is also known as "May", "White Hawthorn" or "Quick"

This image is not copyrighted and may be freely used for any purpose. Please credit the artist, original publication if applicable, and the USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database. The following format is suggested and will be appreciated:

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E. et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook. USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee; NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Admin., Bismarck, ND.
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Kingdom Plantae -- Plants, Subkingdom Tracheobionta -- Vascular plants, Superdivision Spermatophyta -- Seed plants, Division Magnoliophyta -- Flowering plants, Class Magnoliopsida -- Dicotyledons, Subclass Rosidae, Order Rosales, Family Rosaceae -- Rose family, Genus Crataegus L. -- hawthorn P, Species Crataegus ×anomala Sarg. (pro sp.) -- P

Text Reference: USDA-NRCS. 2005. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

Herman, D.E. et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook. USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee; NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Admin., Bismarck, ND. Courtesy of ND State Soil Conservation Committee. Provided by USDA NRCS ND State Office. ND.The White Hawthorn Blossom (Crataegus arnoldiana) was named the state flower of Missouri on March 16, 1923. These snall deciduous trees can be very ornamental as we see in this example. The flowers are white and grow in bunches with associated berries They can vary considerably in form, color and size. The White Hawthorn Blossom is most common in southern Missouri. sos.mo.gov/ .

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Friday, July 29, 2005

White Pine Tassel - State Flower of Maine

GENERAL DISTRIBUTION : Eastern white pine is distributed from Newfoundland west to extreme southeastern Manitoba and south to the Great Lake States, along the Atlantic seabord to New Jersey, and in the Appalachian Mountains to northern Georgia. It also occurs in Iowa, western Kentucky, western Tennessee, and Delaware

GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS : Eastern white pine is a large, native, evergreen conifer. It grows rapidly and in 40 years can be 60 feet (18.3 m) tall and 8 to 10 inches (20-25 cm) in diameter Individuals of 150 feet (46 m) and 40 inches (102 cm) in diameter were common in virgin forests. Eastern white pine commonly reaches 200 years of age and may exceed 450 years [68]. In closed stands, boles are free of branches for over two-thirds of their length. Needles are 2.5 to 5.0 inches (6-13 cm) long, and the winged seeds are about 0.8 inches (2 cm) long. The roots are widespreading and moderately deep without a distinct taproot.

AUTHORSHIP AND CITATION : Carey, Jennifer H. 1993. Pinus strobus. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/ [2005, July 29].

Robert H. Mohlenbrock. USDA NRCS. 1995. Northeast wetland flora: Field office guide to plant species. Northeast National Technical Center, Chester, PA. Courtesy of USDA NRCS Wetland Science Institute. Usage Guidelines.White Pine Tassel(Pinus strobus L.) adopted as state flower in 1895 SYNONYMS : Strobus strobus (L.) Small. COMMON NAMES : eastern white pine northern white pine white pine northern pine soft pine Weymouth pine pin blanc

This image is not copyrighted and may be freely used for any purpose. Download Full High Resolution Image Please credit the artist, original publication if applicable, and the USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database. The following format is suggested and will be appreciated:

Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / USDA NRCS. 1995. Northeast wetland flora: Field office guide to plant species. Northeast National Technical Center, Chester, PA.

Text Reference: USDA-NRCS. 2005. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA

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Thursday, July 28, 2005

Goldenrod - State Flower of Kentucky

Flowers in a broad, pyramidal panicle. Adaptable as to site - old fields, roadsides, wet meadows, forest margins. Goldenrods do not cause hayfever! They bloom at the
same time as ragweed, a major offender.

Often used for borders. It will grow in sun or shade in almost any soil. Plant in April and stake in early growth for best results and shape but the seeds may be sown in autumn or spring.

This image is not copyrighted and may be freely used for any purpose. Please credit the artist, original publication if applicable, and the USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database. The following format is suggested and will be appreciated: Download Full High Resolution Image

Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

Kingdom Plantae -- Plants, Subkingdom Tracheobionta -- Vascular plants, Superdivision Spermatophyta -- Seed plants, Division Magnoliophyta -- Flowering plants, Class Magnoliopsida -- Dicotyledons, Subclass Asteridae, Order Asterales, Family Asteraceae -- Aster family, Genus Solidago L. -- goldenrod P, Contains 69 species and 141 accepted taxa overall.

Photo credit Jennifer Anderson. Nahant Marsh, Davenport, Scott Co., IA. 2001.Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis var. scabra) adopted as state flower in 1926. A coarse, hardy, perennial. Ornamental shrub with a somewhat weedy growth as we see in this example.

Text Reference:USDA-NRCS. 2005. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

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Wednesday, July 27, 2005

Rose - State Flower of New York

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E. et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook. USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee; NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Admin., Bismarck, ND.The rose, wild or cultivated, in all its variety and colors, was made the State flower in 1955., Symbol: ROSA5, Group: Dicot, Family: Rosaceae. Roses produce abundant flowers on their thorny bushes as we see in this example.
They are admired for their fragrance amd have been cultivated as early as 4000 BC by Egyptians. Fossil evidence indicates that the family has existed for at least thirty million years. Today their range extends to nearly the the entire northern hemisphere

This image is not copyrighted and may be freely used for any purpose. Please credit the artist, original publication if applicable, and the USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database. The following format is suggested and will be appreciated:

Photo Credit: USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E. et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook. USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee; NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Admin., Bismarck, ND. Download Full High Resolution Image

Kingdom Plantae -- Plants, Subkingdom Tracheobionta -- Vascular plants, Superdivision Spermatophyta -- Seed plants, Division Magnoliophyta -- Flowering, plants, Class Magnoliopsida -- Dicotyledons, Subclass Rosidae, Order Rosales, Family Rosaceae -- Rose family, Genus Rosa L. -- rose. Contains 56 species and 90 accepted taxa overall

Text Reference: USDA, NRCS. 2004. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.5 (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

Rose Growing Simplified. Fourth Edition. 2001. Armand J. Lapierre. Cape Cod, MA SHG Resources

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Tuesday, July 26, 2005

Sunflower - State Flower of Kansas

An Act designating and declaring the helianthus or sunflower to be the state flower and floral emblem of the state of Kansas.

Whekeas, Kansas has a native wild flower common throughout her borders, hardy and conspicuous, of definite, unvarying and striking shape, easily sketched, molded, and carved, having armorial capacities, ideally adapted for artistic reproduction, with its strong, distinct disk and its golden circle of clear glowing rays -a flower that a child can draw on a slate, a woman can work in silk, or a man can carve on stone or fashion in clay; and

Whereas, This flower has to all Kansans a historic symbolism which speaks of frontier days, winding

trails, pathless prairies, and is full of the life aai' > glory of the past, the pride of the present, and ri emblematic of the majesty of a golden future, and i a flower which has given Kansas the world-wide n "the Sunflower State": therefore,

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Kanta*:

Section 1. That the helianthus or wild native sunflower is hereby made, designated and declared to be the state flower and floral emblem of the state of Kansas.

Sec. 2. This act shall take effect and be in full fore* from and after its publication in the statute-book. Approved March 12, 1903.

Creator: Stolz, Gary M. Source: WO8044-010 Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife ServicePhoto frrom the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's online digital media library. Presently, the library system contains the National Image Library, the Service's collection of public domain still photos. Download Full High Resolution Image

Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Year of State Flower Legislation 1903. 10-14’ tall plant with large spadelike leaves and 6-12” yellow flowers with yellow black centers at the top of the stalks. The seeds are edible and the oil is extracted for use in cooking. The flowers habit of turning to face the sun is known as Heliotropism.

Symbol: HEAN3 Group: Dicot Family: Asteraceae Growth Habit: Forb/herb Duration: Annual U.S. Nativity: Native domesticated about 1000 bc. There are 440 members of the family genera in Asteraceae, 62 species in Helianthus. The sunflower is also Known by the Spanish name girasol and is indigenous to all 50 states.

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Yacca Blossom - State Flower of New Mexico

Yucca is perennial was Legislated the New Mexico State flower in 1927. It's sharp leaves may reach a length of up to two feet. The flowers grows in bunches of ten or more on a long spike two to three feet long. They are greenish-white as we see in this photo and each bud may be up to 2 1/2 inches long. At maturity, these are home to the plants long black seeds.

The yucca's short blooming season runs from June to July. Domestic live stock eat the flowers and seedpods. Native Americans found many uses for the yucca. Roots for the production of soap and hair tonic, the flowers as well as seed pods are eatable, the sharp leaf tips amd fibers were used as needles and thread.

Yucca is a member of the agave family (Agavaceae) which includes about 600 species. Members of this family are used to produce fiber and alcoholic drinks (tequila, pulque, and mescal). The genus Yucca contains about 40 species, including the Joshua tree of the Mohave desert. Yucca is a Haitian name, glauca means "blue-green". Y. glauca was first described by English botanist-naturalist Thomas Nuttall in 1813.

Photo frrom the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's online digital media library. Presently, the library system contains the National Image Library--the Service's collection of public domain still photos.

Creator: Stolz, Gary M. Source: WO-8311-031 Publisher: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service(Yucca glauca) AKA "soapweed", "beargrass", and "Spanish bayonet" grows in a wide range from Canada to the Mexican border and may be found at elevations of more than 8,000 ft.

Text references Native Wildflowers of the North Dakota Grasslands by Harold A. Kantrud State Trees and State Flowers by USDA

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Sunday, July 24, 2005

Black-eyed Susan - Maryland State Flower

Description: Black-eyed susan is an annual or short-lived perennial herb. It has hairy, ovate to lance-shaped leaves and stems which are scratchy to the touch. The yellow flower heads may be up to 3 inches in diameter and have purplish to black centers. It typically flowers from June to July. Fall germinating seedlings and perenniating plants overwinter as a low-growing rosette of leaves.

Uses: This plant is used mainly for landscape beautification. It has potential for use in cultivated, garden situations, in naturalized prairie or meadow plantings, and along roadsides.

Site adaptation: Black-eyed susan prefers full sun, but can be grown in light shade. On sites that are heavily shaded, plants produce few flowers and become tall and leggy. It is adapted many soil types, but prefers a well-drained soil. It generally will not persist on poorly drained sites. When growing on rich soils, high in organic matter, plants produce rank growth and are subject to wind or rain damage.

All photographs in the USDA Online Photography Center site are in the public domain. You may use them as you wish, with our blessing, however they may not be used to infer or imply USDA endorsement of any product or position. Neither should they be used to distort the reality of the image they portray.

NRCSCT01030 jpg By: Paul Fusco 2001 Black-eyed Susan flowers in an early successional habitat restoration project in Hartford County ConnecticutBlack-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) The Black Eyed Susan has been the official Maryland flower since 1918. A yellow daisy or cornflower, it blooms in late summer Download Full High Resolution Image

Source of text: USDA File is in PDF format

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Saturday, July 23, 2005

California Poppy - California State Flower

This pretty plant, E. Californica, is one of those which give so marked an aspect to the fields of California, which at times are sheets of various colors, from the profusion of wild flowers.

The Eschscholtzia is one of our prettiest border annuals, with bright orange or yellow flowers, which contrast well with the fine cut, glaucous green foliage.

The plant is ornamental in leaf, bud, flower, and seed, and deserves a place in every garden.

Its culture is very simple, being only to sow the seeds where the plants are to remain, and to thin out the plants when too thick.

Usually the seed will sow itself, and plants come up year after year.

The plants, like all of the poppy family, transplant badly from the long, bare tap-roots, which are wanting in fibres.

For a mass of color this plant is very effective: the only objection to it is, that the flowers only expand in sunshine. We regard it, however, as one of our best hardy annuals.

California Indians cherished the poppy as both a source of food and for oil extracted from the plant. Its botanical name, Eschsholtzia californica, was given by Adelbert Von Chamisso, a naturalist and member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences, who dropped anchor in San Francisco in 1816 in a bay surrounded by hills of the golden flowers. Also sometimes known as the flame flower, la amapola, and copa de oro (cup of gold), the poppy grows wild throughout California. It became the state flower in 1903. Every year April 6 is California Poppy Day, and Governor Wilson proclaimed May 13-18, 1996, Poppy Week.California Indians cherished the poppy as both a source of food and for oil extracted from the plant. Its botanical name, Eschsholtzia californica, was given by Adelbert Von Chamisso, a naturalist and member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences,

who dropped anchor in San Francisco in 1816 in a bay surrounded by hills of the golden flowers. Also sometimes known as the flame flower, la amapola, and copa de oro (cup of gold), the poppy grows wild throughout California. It became the state flower in 1903. Every year April 6 is California Poppy Day, and Governor Wilson proclaimed May 13-18, 1996, Poppy Week. Source; library.ca.gov/

All photographs and images on this page are "public domain" images. Download Full High Resolution Image The credit lines are listed in the captions. You are free to use these images without a release from the National Park Service. However, the photographs and images must not be used to imply National Park Service endorsement of a product, service, organization or individual. The entire set of high resolution photos can be purchased on a CD-R for $10.00 plus shipping. Please address inquiries to Mike Quinn, Grand Canyon National Park Museum Collection.

Friday, July 22, 2005

Long-Leaved Paintbrush - Wyoming State Flower

INDIAN PAINT BRUSH. PAINTED CUP (Castilleja species)

Some of the leaves of this slender herb are crowded together at the top of the stem and colored brightly with red or yellow so that they form a "painted cup", or suggest a brush that has been dipped in a paint-pot. The flowers are comparatively inconspicuous slender tubes, with two lips and are more or less hidden among these gayly colored leaves.

The Indian Paint Brush is usually a plant of open places. There are many species, all of which are showy. The Narrow-leaved Paint Brush is the state flower of Wyoming. (Figwort Family)

All photographs and images on this page are "public domain" images. The credit lines are listed in the captions. You are free to use these images without a release from the National Park Service. However, the photographs and images must not be used to imply National Park Service endorsement of a product, service, organization or individual. Download Full High Resolution Image

Grand Canyon National Park Museum Collection.

THE BRIGHT RED FLOWERS OF LONG-LEAVED PAINTBRUSH (CASTILLEJA LINARAIEFOLIA) GRACE THE INNER CANYON TRAILS OF GRAND CANYON N.P. NPS PHOTO.THE BRIGHT RED FLOWERS OF LONG-LEAVED PAINTBRUSH (CASTILLEJA LINARAIEFOLIA) GRACE THE INNER CANYON TRAILS OF GRAND CANYON N.P. NPS PHOTO. WYOMING STATE FLOWER

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Holidays

New Years
Happy New Year, Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, e.g., LC-USZ62-90145]Happy new year - Currier & Ives--Happy new year, Chinese, Lunar New Year, Rosh Hashanah, (11 Images)

4th of July
Fourth of July fireworks light up the skyline of the nation's capital a few years ago as viewed from the vicinity of Fort McNair, D.C. (photo Army News Service, Army.mil)Fourth of July fireworks, Lexington and Concord, Continental Congress, Declaration of Independence, Old Guard Colonial Color Guard (11 Images)

National Hispanic Heritage Month
During National Hispanic Heritage Month, we recognize the many contributions of Hispanic Americans.National Hispanic Heritage Month - During National Hispanic Heritage Month,
we recognize the many contributions of Hispanic Americans. (3 Images). National Hispanic Heritage Month 2 - Hispanic Americans have pursued their dreams and contributed to the strength and vitality of our Nation. (3 Images)

Rosh Hashanah (Rosh ha Shanah)
Shofar. Sabbath Horn. Yemenite Jew (2 Images)Rosh Hashanah (Rosh ha Shanah) - Shofar. Sabbath Horn. Yemenite Jew. Rosh Hashanah celebrates the creation of the world and is a time for reflection and self evaluation. (2 Images)

Ramadan
Our best wishes for a blessed Ramadan. Ramadan Mubarak. (3 Images)Ramadan - Our best wishes for a blessed Ramadan. Ramadan Mubarak. (3 Images)

Yom Kippur
Jews Praying in the Synagogue on Yom Kippur. (2 Images)Yom Kippur - Jews Praying in the Synagogue on Yom Kippur. Vienna. 1878. Oil on canvas Tel Aviv Museum of Art. (2 Images)

Columbus Day
Columbus Day -[Christopher Columbus]. CREATED, PUBLISHED, c1908. (3 Images)Columbus Day -[Christopher Columbus]. CREATED, PUBLISHED, c1908. (3 Images)

Halloween
Halloween - Pumpkins, Witches, Ghosts and Goblins. Skeletons, Skulls and Bats. Trick or Treat and all things Halloween are here (21 Images).

Chanucka
7-branch Days-of-Creation menorah, Chanukah - 7-branch Days-of-Creation menorah, Chanukah, Hanukkah, Hannukah, Hanukah, Chanuka, Chanukkah, we recite the blessings, and light the lights from left to right. So, the first one we prepare in the Menorah is the last one we light. (6 Images)

Christmas
Official 2004 Christmas tree White House photo by Susan SternerChristmas - Santa Claus, Creche, Ornaments, Reindeer, Angels, Christmas Trees. The Spirit of Christmas past, present and future, candy and Sugar Plums, rare and more (30 Images).

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Thursday, July 21, 2005

UH-60L Blackhawk

Mission: Provide air assault, general support, aeromedical evacuation, command and control and special operations support to combat and stability and support operations.

Entered Army Service: 1979

Description and Specifications: The UH 60 Black Hawk is a utility tactical transport helicopter that replaces the UH-1 "Huey". The versatile Black Hawk has enhanced the overall mobility of The Army, due to dramatic improvements in troop capacity and cargo lift capability, and will serve as The Army's utility helicopter in the Objective Force. On the asymmetric battlefield, it provides the commander the agility to get to the fight quicker and to mass effects throughout the battlespace across the full spectrum of conflict. An entire 11-person, fully-equipped infantry squad can be lifted in a single Black Hawk, transported faster than in predecessor systems, in most weather conditions. The Black Hawk can reposition a 105 mm Howitzer, its crew of six, and lift up to 30 rounds of ammunition in a single lift. The aircraft's critical components and systems are armored or redundant, and its airframe is designed to progressively crush on impact to protect the crew and passengers.

UH-60L Blackhawk helicopterby Courtesy of DoD January 26, 2004 A UH-60L Blackhawk helicopter flies a low-level mission over Iraq. Army aviation assets are playing a key role in Operation Iraqi Freedom and the Global War on Terrorism. by Courtesy of DoD, January 26, 2004
UH-60 Blackhawk helicopterIraqi Army Soldiers and U.S. troops from Company A, Third Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, recover to a 5th Battalion,
101st Combat Aviation Brigade UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter during Operation Swarmer by Sgt. Ryan Matson, March 27, 2006
by Courtesy of DoD January 26, 2004 A UH-60L Blackhawk helicopter flies a low-level mission over Iraq. Army aviation assets are playing a key role in Operation Iraqi Freedom and the Global War on Terrorism. Photo courtesy of the Department of Defense. This photo appeared on www.army.mil.
Photos courtesy of the Department of Defense. These photos appeared on www.army.mil. Images on the Army Web site are cleared for release and are considered in the public domain.

Request credit be given as "Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army" and credit to individual photographer whenever possible.

Wednesday, July 20, 2005

AV-8B Harrier II+

050215-N-7945K-027 jpg Atlantic Ocean (Feb. 15, 2005) - An AV-8B Harrier II+, assigned to the “Bulldogs” of Marine Attack Squadron Two Two Three (VMA-223), prepares for landing over the flight deck aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Nassau (LHA 4). The AV-8B is a high performance, single-engine, single-seat, Vertical/Short Take-off and Landing (V/STOL) attack aircraft. The AV-8B Harrier II+ is capable of night and adverse weather operations due to the addition of the AN/APG-65 multi-mode radar. The fusion of night and radar capabilities allows the Harrier to be responsive to the Marine Air-Ground Task Force's needs for expeditionary, night and adverse weather, offensive air support. Nassau's Air Department practiced handling the Harriers for the phase three landing qualification during a two-week underway period. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Andrew King (RELEASED)050215-N-7945K-027 jpg Atlantic Ocean (Feb. 15, 2005) - An AV-8B Harrier II+, assigned to the “Bulldogs” of Marine Attack Squadron Two Two Three (VMA-223), prepares for landing over the flight deck aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Nassau (LHA 4).
The AV-8B is a high performance, single-engine, single-seat, Vertical/Short Take-off and Landing (V/STOL) attack aircraft. The AV-8B Harrier II+ is capable of night and adverse weather operations due to the addition of the AN/APG-65 multi-mode radar. The fusion of night and radar capabilities allows the Harrier to be responsive to the Marine Air-Ground Task Force's needs for expeditionary, night and adverse weather, offensive air support. Nassau's Air Department practiced handling the Harriers for the phase three landing qualification during a two-week underway period. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Andrew King (RELEASED) Download Full High Resolution Image All information on navy.mil is public domain and may be distributed or copied unless otherwise specified. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

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RELATED: Sunday, June 19, 2005 C-5 Galaxy, Sunday, June 19, 2005 B-2 Spirit, Monday, June 20, 2005 B-52B, Tuesday, June 21, 2005 B-1 Lancer, Wednesday, June 22, 2005 U-2 Dragon Lady, Thursday, June 23, 2005 A-10 Thunderbolt II, Friday, June 24, 2005 F-117 Nighthawk, Saturday, June 25, 2005 F-15E Strike Eagle, Sunday, June 26, 2005 F-16C Fighting Falcon, Monday, June 27, 2005 F/A-22 Raptor, Tuesday, June 28, 2005 X-35, Joint Strike Fighter, Wednesday, June 29, 2005 CH-47 Chinook, Thursday, June 30, 2005 HH-60G Pave Hawk, Friday, July 01, 2005 MH-53J Pave Low IIIE, Saturday, July 02, 2005 UH-1N Huey, Sunday, July 03, 2005 E-3 Sentry, Monday, July 04, 2005 E-8C Joint STARS, Tuesday, July 05, 2005 RC-135U Combat Sent, Wednesday, July 06, 2005 CV-22 Osprey, Thursday, July 07, 2005 Air Force One, Friday, July 08, 2005 KC-10A Extender, Saturday, July 09, 2005 T-38 Talon, Sunday, July 10, 2005 T-6A Texan II, Monday, July 11, 2005 T-37 Tweet, Tuesday, July 12, 2005 T-43A Trainer, Wednesday, July 13, 2005 C-130 Hercules, Thursday, July 14, 2005 C-141 Starlifter, Friday, July 15, 2005 C-17 Globemaster III, Saturday, July 16, 2005 C-21A, Sunday, July 17, 2005 F-18 Hornet, Monday, July 18, 2005 E-2C Hawkeye, Tuesday, July 19, 2005 F-14D Tomcat, Wednesday, July 20, 2005 AV-8B Harrier II+, Thursday, July 21, 2005 UH-60L Blackhawk, Thursday, September 07, 2006 Science and Technology, North American's X-15, Sunday, September 03, 2006 Science and Technology, Bell X-1 Rocket Plane, Saturday, September 30, 2006 Science and Technology, SR-71 Blackbird

Tuesday, July 19, 2005

F-14D Tomcat

Description: The F-14 Tomcat is a supersonic, twin-engine, variable sweep wing, two-place strike fighter manufactured by Grumman Aircraft Corporation. The multiple tasks of navigation, target acquisition, electronic counter measures (ECM), and weapons employment are divided between the pilot and the radar intercept officer (RIO). Primary missions include precision strike against ground targets, air superiority, and fleet air defense.

Features: As a Strike Fighter, the Tomcat is capable of deploying an assortment of air-to-ground ordnance (MK-80 series GP bombs, LGBs and JDAM) in various configurations, while simultaneously carrying the AIM-7, AIM-9 and AIM-54 air-to-air missiles. The F-14 also has the LANTIRN targeting system that allows delivery of various laser-guided bombs for precision strikes in air-to-ground combat missions and for battle damage assessment. With its Fast Tactical Imagery (FTI) system the F-14 can transmit and receive targeting/reconnaissance imagery in-flight to provide time sensitive strike capability. A number of F-14s also carry the Tactical Air Reconnaissance Pod System (TARPS) providing in-theater tactical reconnaissance.

Background: The F-14 has completed its decommissioning from the U.S. Navy. It was slated to remain in service through at least 2008, but all F-14A and F-14B airframes have already been retired, and the last two squadrons, the VF-31 Tomcatters and the VF-213 Black Lions, both flying the "D" models, arrived for their last fly-in at Naval Air Station Oceana on March 10, 2006. The F-14 Tomcat was officially retired on September 22, 2006 at Naval Air Station Oceana.

050418-N-5431H-002 jpg Virginia Beach, Va. (April 18, 2005) – An F-14D Tomcat, assigned to the “Grim Reapers” of Fighter Squadron One Zero One (VF-101), takes off on an acceptance flight from Naval Air Station Oceana, Va. The F-14D Tomcat, recently transferred from Fighter Squadron Three One (VF-31), is painted in retro 1970’s-era markings and will be the last Tomcat that VF-101 will possess till disestablishment in September 2005. VF-101 is the U.S. Navy's sole Fleet Replacement Squadron for the F-14 Tomcat, training aircrew and maintenance personnel for the fleet. The squadron trains pilots, radar intercept officers, and enlisted personnel in the operation and employment of the F-14 Tomcat fighter. U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Rico Harris (RELEASED)050418-N-5431H-002 jpg Virginia Beach, Va. (April 18, 2005) – An F-14D Tomcat, assigned to the “Grim Reapers” of Fighter Squadron One Zero One (VF-101), takes off on an acceptance flight from Naval Air Station Oceana, Va. The F-14D Tomcat,

recently transferred from Fighter Squadron Three One (VF-31), is painted in retro 1970’s-era markings and will be the last Tomcat that VF-101 will possess till disestablishment in September 2005. VF-101 is the U.S. Navy's sole Fleet Replacement Squadron for the F-14 Tomcat, training aircrew and maintenance personnel for the fleet. The squadron trains pilots, radar intercept officers, and enlisted personnel in the operation and employment of the F-14 Tomcat fighter. U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Rico Harris (RELEASED) Download Full High Resolution Image All information on navy.mil is public domain and may be distributed or copied unless otherwise specified. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

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Monday, July 18, 2005

E-2C Hawkeye

Description: The E-2 Hawkeye is the Navy's all-weather, carrier-based tactical battle management airborne early warning, command and control aircraft. The E-2 is a twin engine, five crewmember, high-wing turboprop aircraft with a 24-foot diameter radar rotodome attached to the upper fuselage.

Features: The Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and command and control functions for the Carrier Strike Group and Joint Force Commander. Additional missions include surface surveillance coordination, air interdiction, offensive and defensive counter air control, close air support coordination, time critical strike coordination, search and rescue airborne coordination and communications relay. An integral component of the Carrier Strike Group air wing, the E-2C uses computerized radar, Identification Friend or Foe and electronic surveillance sensors to provide early warning, threat analysis against potentially hostile air and surface targets.

Background: The continuous improvements in early airborne radars by 1956 led to the concept of an airborne early warning and command and control aircraft. The first aircraft to perform this mission was the Grumman E-1 Tracer (a variant of the S-2 Tracker anti-submarine aircraft), which saw service from 1954 to 1964. The E-1's successor, the E-2 Hawkeye, was the first carrier-based aircraft designed from the outset for the all-weather airborne early warning and command and control mission.

050712-N-5345W-024 jpg Atlantic Ocean (July 12, 2005) - An E-2C Hawkeye, assigned to the 'Seahawks' of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron One Two Six (VAW-126), takes to the air after conducting a touch-and-go landing on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Truman is currently conducting carrier qualifications in the Atlantic Ocean. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Kristopher Wilson (RELEASED)050712-N-5345W-024 jpg Atlantic Ocean (July 12, 2005) - An E-2C Hawkeye, assigned to the "Seahawks" of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron One Two Six (VAW-126),

takes to the air after conducting a touch-and-go landing on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Truman is currently conducting carrier qualifications in the Atlantic Ocean. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Kristopher Wilson (RELEASED) Download Full High Resolution Image All information on navy.mil is public domain and may be distributed or copied unless otherwise specified. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

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Sunday, July 17, 2005

F-18 Hornet

Description: All-weather fighter and attack aircraft. The single-seat F/A-18 Hornet is the nation's first strike-fighter. It was designed for traditional strike applications such as interdiction and close air support without compromising its fighter capabilities. With its excellent fighter and self-defense capabilities, the F/A-18 at the same time increases strike mission survivability and supplements the F-14 Tomcat in fleet air defense. F/A-18 Hornets are currently operating in 37 tactical squadrons from air stations world-wide, and from 10 aircraft carriers. The U.S. Navy's Blue Angels Flight Demonstration Squadron proudly flies them. The Hornet comprises the aviation strike force for seven foreign customers including Canada, Australia, Finland, Kuwait, Malaysia, Spain and Switzerland.

The newest model, Super Hornet, is highly capable across the full mission spectrum: air superiority, fighter escort, reconnaissance, aerial refueling, close air support, air defense suppression and day/night precision strike. Compared to the original F/A-18 A through D models, Super Hornet has longer range, an aerial refueling capability, increased survivability/lethality and improved carrier suitability. [Capability of precision-guided munitions: JDAM (all variants) and JSOW. JASSM in the future]

Features: The F/A-18 Hornet, an all-weather aircraft, is used as an attack aircraft as well as a fighter. In its fighter mode, the F/A-18 is used primarily as a fighter escort and for fleet air defense; in its attack mode, it is used for force projection, interdiction and close and deep air support.

011026-F-4884R-006 jpg, U.S. Navy F/A-18 prepares for aerial refueling. Operation Enduring Freedom, Oct. 26, 2001 --Following early morning bombing missions, an F-18 'Hornet' flies in the post-contact position during an aerial refueling mission with a KC-135R from the 319th Air Expeditionary Group. The 319th AEG is deployed to a forward deployed location in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Scott Reed (RELEASED)011026-F-4884R-006 jpg, U.S. Navy F/A-18 prepares for aerial refueling. Operation Enduring Freedom, Oct. 26, 2001 --Following early morning bombing missions, an F-18 'Hornet' flies in the post-contact position during an aerial refueling mission

with a KC-135R from the 319th Air Expeditionary Group. The 319th AEG is deployed to a forward deployed location in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Scott Reed (RELEASED) Download Full High Resolution Image All information on navy.mil is public domain and may be distributed or copied unless otherwise specified. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

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Saturday, July 16, 2005

C-21A

Mission: The C-21 is a twin turbofan engine aircraft used for cargo and passenger airlift. The aircraft is the military version of the Lear Jet 35A business jet. In addition to providing cargo and passenger airlift, the aircraft is capable of transporting one litter or five ambulatory patients during aeromedical evacuations.

Features: The turbofan engines are pod-mounted on the sides of the rear fuselage. The swept-back wings have hydraulically actuated, single-slotted flaps. The aircraft has a retractable tricycle landing gear, single steerable nose gear and multiple-disc hydraulic brakes.

The C-21 can carry eight passengers and 42 cubic feet (1.26 cubic meters) of cargo. The fuel capacity of the C-21 is 931 gallons (3,537.8 liters) with refueling accomplished at ground level through each wingtip tank. The safety and operational capabilities of the C-21 are increased by the autopilot, color weather radar and tactical air navigation system, as well as high frequency, very high frequency and ultra high frequency radios.

The aircraft has a crew of two and may be flown from either cockpit seat. It is equipped with an automatic navigation system to enhance crew efficiency. Four cathode ray tubes display essential information to the pilots.

The C-21A provides cargo and passenger airlift and can transport litters during medical evacuations. The C-21A's turbofan engines are pod-mounted on the sides of the rear fuselage. The swept-back wings have hydraulically actuated, single-slotted flaps. The aircraft has a retractable tricycle landing gear, single steerable nose gear and multiple-disc hydraulic brakes. The C-21A can carry eight passengers and 42 cubic feet (1.26 cubic meters) of cargo. The fuel capacity ofthe C-21A is 931 gallons (3,537.8 liters) carried in wingtip tanks. The safety and operational capabilities of the C-21A are increased by the autopilot, color weather radar and tactical air navigation (TACAN) system, as well as HF, VHF and UHF radios. (U.S. Air Force photo)The C-21A provides cargo and passenger airlift and can transport litters during medical evacuations. The C-21A's turbofan engines are pod-mounted on the sides of the rear fuselage. The swept-back wings have hydraulically actuated, single-slotted flaps.

The aircraft has a retractable tricycle landing gear, single steerable nose gear and multiple-disc hydraulic brakes. The C-21A can carry eight passengers and 42 cubic feet (1.26 cubic meters) of cargo. The fuel capacity ofthe C-21A is 931 gallons (3,537.8 liters) carried in wingtip tanks. The safety and operational capabilities of the C-21A are increased by the autopilot, color weather radar and tactical air navigation (TACAN) system, as well as HF, VHF and UHF radios. (U.S. Air Force photo) Download Full High Resolution Image Information presented on Air Force Link is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

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Friday, July 15, 2005

C-17 Globemaster III

Mission: The C-17 Globemaster III is the newest, most flexible cargo aircraft to enter the airlift force. The C-17 is capable of rapid strategic delivery of troops and all types of cargo to main operating bases or directly to forward bases in the deployment area. The aircraft can perform tactical airlift and airdrop missions and can also transport litters and ambulatory patients during aeromedical evacuations when required. The inherent flexibility and performance of the C-17 force improve the ability of the total airlift system to fulfill the worldwide air mobility requirements of the United States.

The ultimate measure of airlift effectiveness is the ability to rapidly project and sustain an effective combat force close to a potential battle area. Threats to U.S. interests have changed in recent years, and the size and weight of U.S.-mechanized firepower and equipment have grown in response to improved capabilities of potential adversaries. This trend has significantly increased air mobility requirements, particularly in the area of large or heavy outsize cargo. As a result, newer and more flexible airlift aircraft are needed to meet potential armed contingencies, peacekeeping or humanitarian missions worldwide. The C-17 is capable of meeting today's demanding airlift missions.

C-17 Globemaster IIIThe C-17 Globemaster III is the newest, most flexible cargo aircraft to enter the airlift force. The C-17 is capable of rapid strategic delivery of troops and all types of cargo to main operating bases or directly to forward bases in the deployment area.
The aircraft can perform tactical airlift and airdrop missions and can also transport litters and ambulatory patients during aeromedical evacuations when required. The inherent flexibility and performance of the C-17 force improve the ability of the total airlift system to fulfill the worldwide air mobility requirements of the United States.
Combat landing NORTHFIELD AIR BASE, S.C. - A C-17 Globemaster III from the 437th Airlift Wing at Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., performs a combat landing during an incentive flight here recently. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Hannen)Combat landing NORTHFIELD AIR BASE, S.C. - A C-17 Globemaster III from the 437th Airlift Wing at Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., performs a combat landing during an incentive flight here recently.
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Thursday, July 14, 2005

C-141 Starlifter

Since 1965, the C-141 Starlifter has been one of the "workhorses" of the Air Force. The aircraft fulfills the vast spectrum of airlift requirements through its ability to airlift combat forces over long distances, deliver those forces and their equipment either by air, land or airdrop, resupply forces and transport the sick and wounded from the hostile area to advanced medical facilities.

The Starlifter was the aircraft dubbed the "Hanoi Taxi" by repatriating more than 500 American prisoners of war held in North Vietnam. C-141s brought flood relief to Minnesota in 1979, to the Azores in 1980 and to Louisiana in 1983. During Desert Storm, C-141s flew more than 37,000 departures with an on-time record above 90 percent. The Starlifter has logged more than 10 million hours, including a record set in 1981 when a C-141 flew 67,000 pounds of cargo non-stop from New Jersey to Saudi Arabia, refueling three times in flight.

The first C-141A, delivered to Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., in October 1964, began squadron operations in April 1965. The C-141 was the first jet transport from which U.S. Army paratroopers jumped, and the first to land in the Antarctic.

The aircraft has undergone various modifications, and all active C-141s are the "B" model.

The C-141 Starlifter is the workhorse of the Air Mobility Command. The Starlifter fulfills the vast spectrum of airlift requirements through its ability to airlift combat forces over long distances, inject those forces and their equipment either by airland or airdrop, re-supply employed forces, and extract the sick and wounded from the hostile area to advanced medical facility. (U.S. Air Force photo)The C-141 Starlifter is the workhorse of the Air Mobility Command. The Starlifter fulfills the vast spectrum of airlift requirements through its ability to airlift combat forces over long distances, inject those forces and their equipment

either by airland or airdrop, re-supply employed forces, and extract the sick and wounded from the hostile area to advanced medical facility. (U.S. Air Force photo) Download Full High Resolution Image

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Wednesday, July 13, 2005

C-130 Hercules

Mission: The C-130 Hercules primarily performs the tactical portion of the airlift mission. The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for air dropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. The C-130 operates throughout the U.S. Air Force, serving with Air Mobility Command, Air Force Special Operations Command, Air Combat Command, U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Pacific Air Forces, Air National Guard and the Air Force Reserve Command, fulfilling a wide range of operational missions in both peace and war situations. Basic and specialized versions of the aircraft airframe perform a diverse number of roles, including airlift support, Antarctic ice resupply, aeromedical missions, weather reconnaissance, aerial spray missions, firefighting duties for the U.S. Forest Service and natural disaster relief missions.

Features: Using its aft loading ramp and door the C-130 can accommodate a wide variety of oversized cargo, including everything from utility helicopters and six-wheeled armored vehicles to standard palletized cargo and military personnel. In an aerial delivery role, it can airdrop loads up to 42,000 pounds or use its high-flotation landing gear to land and deliver cargo on rough, dirt strips.

The flexible design of the Hercules enables it to be configured for many different missions, allowing for one aircraft to perform the role of many.

OVER THE ATLANTIC OCEAN -- A C-130 Hercules from the 2nd Airlift Squadron, Pope Air Force Base, N.C., flies over the Atlantic Ocean. The C-130 Hercules primarily performs the intratheater portion of the airlift mission. The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for paradropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Howard Blair)OVER THE ATLANTIC OCEAN -- A C-130 Hercules from the 2nd Airlift Squadron, Pope Air Force Base, N.C., flies over the Atlantic Ocean. The C-130 Hercules primarily performs the intratheater portion of the airlift mission.

The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for paradropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Howard Blair) Download Full High Resolution Image Information presented on Air Force Link is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

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Tuesday, July 12, 2005

T-43A Trainer

Mission: The T-43A is a medium-range, swept-wing jet aircraft equipped with modern navigation and communications equipment to train navigators for strategic and tactical aircraft.

Features: The T-43A is the Air Force version of the Boeing 737 transport. One jet engine is mounted under each wing. The exterior differences between the military and commercial aircraft include many small blade-type antennas, sextant ports, a wire antenna for a high-frequency radio and fewer windows.

Inside each T-43A training compartment are two minimum proficiency, two maximum proficiency and 12 student stations. Two stations form a console and instructors can move their seats to the consoles and sit beside students for individual instruction.

The large cabin allows easy access to seating and storage, yet reduces the distance between student stations and instructor positions.

The student-training compartment is equipped with advanced avionics gear identical to Air Force operational aircraft. The equipment includes mapping radar, very high frequency omnidirectional range and tactical air navigation radio systems; inertial navigation systems; radar altimeter and all required communication equipment.

The T-43A is a medium-range, swept-wing jet aircraft equipped with modern navigation and communications equipment to train navigators for strategic and tactical aircraft. The T-43A is primarily used in the Air Force's undergraduate navigator training program. Several T-43s are configured for passengers and provide operational support to assigned commands and the Air National Guard. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Fernando Serna)The T-43A is a medium-range, swept-wing jet aircraft equipped with modern navigation and communications equipment to train navigators for strategic and tactical aircraft. The T-43A is primarily used in the Air Force's undergraduate

navigator training program. Several T-43s are configured for passengers and provide operational support to assigned commands and the Air National Guard. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Fernando Serna) Download Full High Resolution Image

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Monday, July 11, 2005

T-37 Tweet

The T-37 Tweet formally retired April 3 from Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training here after 39 years of service as the gateway to the sky for more than 10,000 Air Force aviators.

Columbus Air Force Base was the last Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training base flying the T-37, but the T-37 will continue to be used at Sheppard AFB, Texas, in the Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program.

Vance AFB, Okla., and Laughlin AFB, Texas, phased out the T-37 from their pilot training programs in 2007.

"If you are a flier or a maintainer of any airplane, there is an emotional attachment," said Maj. Gen. Irving L. Halter Jr., the 19th Air Force commander. "The T-37 is a part of the fabric of Air Force aviation as well as American aviation."

The first T-37 arrived at Columbus AFB in 1969 in preparation for the base's realignment from Strategic Air Command to Air Training Command in 1970.

In 1970, Columbus AFB officials undertook the undergraduate pilot training mission, usng the T-37 for its primary training, and the T-38 talon for advanced training.

A T-37 Tweet aircraft from the 85th Fighter Training Squadron, (Editors Note. misstatement from official AF site, should read '85th Flying Training Squadron'A T-37 Tweet aircraft from the 85th Fighter Training Squadron, (Editors Note. misstatement from official AF site, T-37 Tweet, should read "85th Flying Training Squadron") Laughlin AFB, Texas, flies over Lake Amistad during a training mission.

The T-37 Tweet is a twin-engine jet used for training undergraduate pilots, undergraduate navigator and tactical navigator students in fundamentals of aircraft handling, and instrument, formation and night flying. The twin engines and flying characteristics of the T-37 give student pilots the feel for handling the larger, faster T-38 Talon or T-1A Jayhawk later in the undergraduate pilot training course. The instructor and student sit side by side for more effective training. The cockpit has dual controls, ejection seats and a clamshell-type canopy that can be jettisoned. (Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Andy Dunaway) Download Full High Resolution Image

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Sunday, July 10, 2005

T-6A Texan II

Mission: The T-6A Texan II is a single-engine, two-seat primary trainer designed to train Joint Primary Pilot Training, or JPPT, students in basic flying skills common to U.S. Air Force and Navy pilots.

Features: Produced by Raytheon Aircraft, the T-6A Texan II is a military trainer version of Raytheon's Beech/Pilatus PC-9 Mk II.

Stepped-tandem seating in the single cockpit places one crewmember in front of the other, with the student and instructor positions being interchangeable. A pilot may also fly the aircraft alone from the front seat. Pilots enter the T-6A cockpit through a side-opening, one-piece canopy that has demonstrated resistance to bird strikes at speeds up to 270 knots.

The T-6A has a Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-68 turbo-prop engine that delivers 1,100 horsepower. Because of its excellent thrust-to-weight ratio, the aircraft can perform an initial climb of 3,100 feet (944.8 meters) per minute and can reach 18,000 feet (5,486.4 meters) in less than six minutes.

The aircraft is fully aerobatic and features a pressurized cockpit with an anti-G system, ejection seat and an advanced avionics package with sunlight-readable liquid crystal displays.

RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- The T-6A Texan II is a single-engine, two-seat primary trainer designed to train Joint Primary Pilot Training, or JPPT, students in basic flying skills common to U.S. Air Force and Navy pilots. The trainer is phasing out the aging T-37 fleet throughout Air Education and Training Command. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. David Richards)RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- The T-6A Texan II is a single-engine, two-seat primary trainer designed to train Joint Primary Pilot Training, or JPPT, students in basic flying skills common to U.S. Air Force and Navy pilots.

The trainer is phasing out the aging T-37 fleet throughout Air Education and Training Command. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. David Richards) Download Full High Resolution Image. Information presented on Air Force Link is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

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Saturday, July 9, 2005

Aircraft

Attack
FORT POLK, La. -- An A-10 Thunderbolt II drops several flares after destroying a ground target during a live-fire engagement as part of Air Warrior II here. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Stephen Otero)A-10 Thunderbolt II drops several flares after destroying a ground target during a live-fire engagement as part of Air Warrior II

050215-N-7945K-027 jpg Atlantic Ocean (Feb. 15, 2005) - An AV-8B Harrier II+, assigned to the “Bulldogs” of Marine Attack Squadron Two Two Three (VMA-223), prepares for landing over the flight deck aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Nassau (LHA 4). The AV-8B is a high performance, single-engine, single-seat, Vertical/Short Take-off and Landing (V/STOL) attack aircraft. The AV-8B Harrier II+ is capable of night and adverse weather operations due to the addition of the AN/APG-65 multi-mode radar. The fusion of night and radar capabilities allows the Harrier to be responsive to the Marine Air-Ground Task Force's needs for expeditionary, night and adverse weather, offensive air support. Nassau's Air Department practiced handling the Harriers for the phase three landing qualification during a two-week underway period. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Andrew King (RELEASED)An AV-8B Harrier II+, assigned to the “Bulldogs” of Marine Attack Squadron Two Two Three (VMA-223), prepares for landing over the flight deck

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. -- An F-117 Nighthawk flies over the Nevada desert. The unique design of the single-seat F-117 provides exceptional combat capabilities. The fighter can employ a variety of weapons and is equipped with sophisticated navigation and attack systems integrated into a digital avionics suite that increases mission effectiveness and reduces pilot workload. Detailed planning for missions into highly defended target areas is accomplished by an automated mission planning system developed, specifically, to take advantage of the unique capabilities of the Nighthawk. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Aaron D. Allmon II)An F-117 Nighthawk flies over the Nevada desert. The unique design of the single-seat F-117 provides exceptional combat capabilities.

Bombers
OVER THE PACIFIC OCEAN -- A B-2 Spirit soars through the sky after a refueling mission here May 2. The B-2 is assigned to the 393rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron from Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. The bomber is currently deployed to Andersen AFB, Guam, as part of a continuous bomber presence in the Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)A B-2 Spirit soars through the sky after a refueling mission here May 2. The B-2 is assigned to the 393rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron from Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo.

NASA's B-52B launch aircraft takes off carrying an X-43A hypersonic research aircraft on an evaluation flight Sept. 27. The B-52, the oldest still flying, was officially retired from service during a ceremony at Edwards Air Force Base Dec. 17. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration photo by Tom Tschida)NASA's B-52B launch aircraft takes off carrying an X-43A hypersonic research aircraft on an evaluation flight Sept. 27.

Bomber power, INDIAN SPRINGS AIR FORCE AUXILIARY FIELD, Nev. - A B-1 Lancer performs a fly-by during a firepower demonstration here recently. The bomber is from the 7th Bomb Wing at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Robert W. Valenca)A B-1 Lancer performs a fly-by during a firepower demonstration here recently. The bomber is from the 7th Bomb Wing at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas.

Fighters
050418-N-5431H-002 jpg Virginia Beach, Va. (April 18, 2005) – An F-14D Tomcat, assigned to the “Grim Reapers” of Fighter Squadron One Zero One (VF-101), takes off on an acceptance flight from Naval Air Station Oceana, Va. The F-14D Tomcat, recently transferred from Fighter Squadron Three One (VF-31), is painted in retro 1970’s-era markings and will be the last Tomcat that VF-101 will possess till disestablishment in September 2005. VF-101 is the U.S. Navy's sole Fleet Replacement Squadron for the F-14 Tomcat, training aircrew and maintenance personnel for the fleet. The squadron trains pilots, radar intercept officers, and enlisted personnel in the operation and employment of the F-14 Tomcat fighter. U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Rico Harris (RELEASED)An F-14D Tomcat, assigned to the “Grim Reapers” of Fighter Squadron One Zero One (VF-101), takes off on an acceptance flight from Naval Air Station Oceana, Va.

OVER THE NORTH SEA -- An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 494th Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, United Kingdom, banks away after receiving fuel during a training mission here July 19. The F-15E Strike Eagle is considered the most advanced two-seat tactical aircraft in the world. The 'E's' radar system allows aircrews to pick out bridges and airfields on the radar display from distances more than 80 miles away. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Tony R. Tolley)An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 494th Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, United Kingdom, banks away after receiving fuel during a training mission

OVER NEVADA -- An F-16C Fighting Falcon, assigned to the 27th Fighter Wing, Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., heads out for a mission over the Nevada Test and Training Ranges during Red Flag 04-3 here Aug 20. More than 100 aircraft and 2,500 participants are involved in this exercise. Red Flag is a realistic combat training exercise involving the U.S. Air Force and its allies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Kevin Gruenwald) An F-16C Fighting Falcon, assigned to the 27th Fighter Wing, Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., heads out for a mission

011026-F-4884R-006 jpg, U.S. Navy F/A-18 prepares for aerial refueling. Operation Enduring Freedom, Oct. 26, 2001 --Following early morning bombing missions, an F-18 'Hornet' flies in the post-contact position during an aerial refueling mission with a KC-135R from the 319th Air Expeditionary Group. The 319th AEG is deployed to a forward deployed location in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Scott Reed (RELEASED)F-18 'Hornet' flies in the post-contact position during an aerial refueling mission with a KC-135R from the 319th Air Expeditionary Group.

ABOVE THE MOJAVE DESERT -- The Air Force's new superiority fighter will dominate the future air combat arena by integrating advanced avionics, stealth and supercruise. With approximately 80 percent of development complete and two test aircraft flying, the F/A-22 Raptor program is nearing completion of a 13-year development program. (U.S. Air Force photo Judson Brohmer)the F/A-22 Raptor program is nearing completion of a 13-year development program. (U.S. Air Force photo Judson Brohmer)

LOCKHEED MARTIN X-35, Joint Strike Fighter. Nears completion of flight testing at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. The JSF is being built in three variants: a conventional take-off and landing aircraft (CTOL) for the US Air Force; a carrier based variant (CV) for the US Navy; and a short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft for the US Marine Corps and the Royal Navy. (U.S. Air Force photo)LOCKHEED MARTIN X-35, Joint Strike Fighter. Nears completion of flight testing at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. The JSF is being built in three variants

Helicopters
UH-1N Huey -- The UH-1N Huey is a light-lift Air Force utility helicopter used for support of Department of Defense contingency plans. The helicopter has a number of uses. Its primary mission includes airlift of emergency security and disaster response forces, medical evacuation, security surveillance of off-base movements of nuclear weapons convoys and test range areas during launch conditions. It is also used for space shuttle landing support, priority maintenance dispatch support, and search and rescue operations. Other uses include airlift of missile support personnel, airborne cable inspections and distinguished visitor transport. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Andy Dunaway)UH-1N Huey -- The UH-1N Huey is a light-lift Air Force utility helicopter used for support of Department of Defense contingency plans. The helicopter has a number of uses.

Soldiers sling-load a vehicle to a CH-47 Chinook helicopter during an operation near Bagram, Afghanistan. The Soldiers are assigned to the 25th Infantry Division, supporting the Joint Logistics Command during Operation Enduring Freedom. This photo appeared on www.army.mil. July 29, 2004 by Sgt. 1st Class Sandra WatkinsKeoughCH-47 Chinook helicopter during an operation near Bagram, Afghanistan. The Soldiers are assigned to the 25th Infantry Division,

by Courtesy of DoD January 26, 2004 A UH-60L Blackhawk helicopter flies a low-level mission over Iraq. Army aviation assets are playing a key role in Operation Iraqi Freedom and the Global War on Terrorism. Photo courtesy of the Department of Defense. This photo appeared on www.army.mil.UH-60L Blackhawk helicopter flies a low-level mission over Iraq. Army aviation assets are playing a key role in Operation Iraqi Freedom

OPERATION SOUTHERN WATCH -- An HH-60G Pave Hawk flies through the sky after refueling from an HC-130P Combat Shadow during a training mission at an operating location in support of Operation Southern Watch. The primary mission of the HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter is to conduct day or night operations into hostile environments to recover downed aircrew or other isolated personnel during war. Because of its versatility, the HH-60G is also tasked to perform military operations other than war. These tasks include civil search and rescue, emergency aeromedical evacuation (MEDEVAC), disaster relief, international aid, counter-drug activities and NASA space shuttle support. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Dave Nolan)HH-60G Pave Hawk flies through the sky after refueling from an HC-130P Combat Shadow during a training mission

Paving the way, KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. -- A 58th Special Operations Wing, 551st Special Operations Squadron, MH-53J Pave Low IIIE flies a training mission. The MH-53J Pave Low IIIE heavy-lift helicopter is the largest, most powerful and technologically advanced helicopter in the Air Force inventory. The terrain-following and terrain-avoidance radar, forward-looking infrared sensor, inertial navigation system with global positioning system, along with a projected map display enable the crew to follow terrain contours and avoid obstacles, making low-level penetration possible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Dave Nolan)MH-53J Pave Low IIIE heavy-lift helicopter is the largest, most powerful and technologically advanced helicopter in the Air Force inventory.

Recon
050712-N-5345W-024 jpg Atlantic Ocean (July 12, 2005) - An E-2C Hawkeye, assigned to the 'Seahawks' of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron One Two Six (VAW-126), takes to the air after conducting a touch-and-go landing on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Truman is currently conducting carrier qualifications in the Atlantic Ocean. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Kristopher Wilson (RELEASED)An E-2C Hawkeye, assigned to the 'Seahawks' of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron One Two Six (VAW-126), takes to the air after conducting a touch-and-go landing

An Air Force U-2 Dragon Lady flies a training mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Rose Reynolds)An Air Force U-2 Dragon Lady flies a training mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Rose Reynolds)

The Lockheed SR-71 remains one of the most exotic and mysterious aircraft of all time.SR-71 Blackbird- The Lockheed SR-71 remains one of the most exotic and mysterious aircraft of all time.

The E-3 Sentry is an airborne warning and control system aircraft that provides all-weather surveillance, command, control and communications needed by commanders of U.S. and NATO air defense forces. As proven in Desert Storm, it is the premier air battle command and control aircraft in the world today. The E-3 Sentry is a modified Boeing 707/320 commercial airframe with a rotating radar dome. The dome is 30 feet in diameter, six feet thick, and is held 11 feet above the fuselage by two struts. It contains a radar subsystem that permits surveillance from the Earth's surface up into the stratosphere, over land or water. The radar has a range of more than 200 miles for low-flying targets and farther for aerospace vehicles flying at medium to high altitudes. The radar combined with an identification friend or foe subsystem can look down to detect, identify and track enemy and friendly low-flying aircraft by eliminating ground clutter returns that confuse other radar systems. (U.S. Air Force photo)The E-3 Sentry is an airborne warning and control system aircraft that provides all-weather surveillance, command, control and communications

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- An E-8C Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System from the 93rd Air Control Wing flies a refueling mission over the skies of Georgia. The Department of Defense will soon deploy Joint STARS and Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle surveillance systems over the Afghan theater of operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The E-8C is an airborne battle management and command and control platform that conducts ground surveillance to develop an understanding of the enemy situation and to support attack operations and targeting that contributes to the delay, disruption and destruction of enemy forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. John Lasky)An E-8C Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (Joint STARS) from the 93rd Air Control Wing flies a refueling mission over the skies of Georgia.

RC-135U Combat Sent OVER GREENVILLE, Texas -- An RC-135U Combat Sent aircraft flies a training mission from Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. There are only two Combat Sent aircraft in the Air Force inventory and both are assigned to the 55th Wing at Offutt AFB (U.S. Air Force photo)An RC-135U Combat Sent aircraft flies a training mission from Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. There are only two Combat Sent aircraft in the Air Force inventory

Special Duty
Futuristic in its design, the CV-22 Osprey looks like a helicopter on the ground with two sets of propeller rotors on each wing tip. Once airborne, the rotors tilt forward so the aircraft resembles a dragonfly with turboprops. (U.S. Air Force photo)the CV-22 Osprey looks like a helicopter on the ground with two sets of propeller rotors on each wing tip. Once airborne, the rotors tilt forward

MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- Air Force One carrying President George W. Bush taxies on the flightline here June 16. The president delivered a speech that was broadcast live to servicemembers worldwide. He said with the transfer of sovereignty two weeks away, the future of a free Iraq is coming into view. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason P. Robertson)Air Force One carrying President George W. Bush taxies on the flightline here June 16. The president delivered a speech that was broadcast live to servicemembers worldwide.

Tankers
A KC-10A Extender from the 6th Air Refueling Squadron, Travis Air Force Base, Calif., cruises on a mission while deployed to the 2nd Air Expeditionary Group, Naval Station Diego Garcia. Although the KC-10A's primary mission is aerial refueling, it can combine the tasks of tanker and cargo aircraft by refueling fighters while carrying the fighters' support people and equipment during overseas deployments. The KC-10A can transport up to 75 people and about 170,000 pounds of cargo a distance of about 4,400 miles. Without cargo, the KC-10A's unrefueled range is more than 11,500 miles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sarah Shaw)A KC-10A Extender from the 6th Air Refueling Squadron, Travis Air Force Base, Calif., cruises on a mission while deployed to the 2nd Air Expeditionary Group,

Trainers
The T-38 Talon is a twin-engine, high-altitude, supersonic jet trainer used in a variety of roles because of its design, economy of operations, ease of maintenance, high performance and exceptional safety record. It is used primarily by Air Education and Training Command for undergraduate pilot and pilot instructor training. Air Combat Command, Air Mobility Command and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration also use the T-38 in various roles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Steve Thurow)The T-38 Talon is a twin-engine, high-altitude, supersonic jet trainer used in a variety of roles because of its design, economy of operations, ease of maintenance, high performance and exceptional safety record

RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- The T-6A Texan II is a single-engine, two-seat primary trainer designed to train Joint Primary Pilot Training, or JPPT, students in basic flying skills common to U.S. Air Force and Navy pilots. The trainer is phasing out the aging T-37 fleet throughout Air Education and Training Command. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. David Richards)The T-6A Texan II is a single-engine, two-seat primary trainer designed to train Joint Primary Pilot Training, or JPPT, students in basic flying skills

A T-37 Tweet aircraft from the 85th Fighter Training Squadron, Laughlin AFB, Texas, flies over Lake Amistad during a training mission. The T-37 Tweet is a twin-engine jet used for training undergraduate pilots, undergraduate navigator and tactical navigator students in fundamentals of aircraft handling, and instrument, formation and night flying. The twin engines and flying characteristics of the T-37 give student pilots the feel for handling the larger, faster T-38 Talon or T-1A Jayhawk later in the undergraduate pilot training course. The instructor and student sit side by side for more effective training. The cockpit has dual controls, ejection seats and a clamshell-type canopy that can be jettisoned. (Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Andy Dunaway)A T-37 Tweet aircraft from the 85th Fighter Training Squadron, Laughlin AFB, Texas, flies over Lake Amistad during a training mission.

The T-43A is a medium-range, swept-wing jet aircraft equipped with modern navigation and communications equipment to train navigators for strategic and tactical aircraft. The T-43A is primarily used in the Air Force's undergraduate navigator training program. Several T-43s are configured for passengers and provide operational support to assigned commands and the Air National Guard. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Fernando Serna)The T-43A is a medium-range, swept-wing jet aircraft equipped with modern navigation and communications equipment to train navigators for strategic and tactical aircraft.

Transport
OVER THE ATLANTIC OCEAN -- A C-130 Hercules from the 2nd Airlift Squadron, Pope Air Force Base, N.C., flies over the Atlantic Ocean. The C-130 Hercules primarily performs the intratheater portion of the airlift mission. The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for paradropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Howard Blair)A C-130 Hercules from the 2nd Airlift Squadron, Pope Air Force Base, N.C., flies over the Atlantic Ocean.

The C-141 Starlifter is the workhorse of the Air Mobility Command. The Starlifter fulfills the vast spectrum of airlift requirements through its ability to airlift combat forces over long distances, inject those forces and their equipment either by airland or airdrop, re-supply employed forces, and extract the sick and wounded from the hostile area to advanced medical facility. (U.S. Air Force photo)The C-141 Starlifter is the workhorse of the Air Mobility Command. The Starlifter fulfills the vast spectrum of airlift requirements

Combat landing NORTHFIELD AIR BASE, S.C. - A C-17 Globemaster III from the 437th Airlift Wing at Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., performs a combat landing during an incentive flight here recently. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Hannen)A C-17 Globemaster III from the 437th Airlift Wing at Charleston Air Force Base, S.C., performs a combat landing during an incentive flight here recently.

Airmen unload vehicles from a C-5 Galaxy here June 11.C-5 Galaxy - Airmen unload vehicles from a C-5 Galaxy here June 11. during Exercise Golden Medic. U.S. Air Force photo.

The C-21A provides cargo and passenger airlift and can transport litters during medical evacuations. The C-21A's turbofan engines are pod-mounted on the sides of the rear fuselage. The swept-back wings have hydraulically actuated, single-slotted flaps. The aircraft has a retractable tricycle landing gear, single steerable nose gear and multiple-disc hydraulic brakes. The C-21A can carry eight passengers and 42 cubic feet (1.26 cubic meters) of cargo. The fuel capacity ofthe C-21A is 931 gallons (3,537.8 liters) carried in wingtip tanks. The safety and operational capabilities of the C-21A are increased by the autopilot, color weather radar and tactical air navigation (TACAN) system, as well as HF, VHF and UHF radios. (U.S. Air Force photo)The C-21A provides cargo and passenger airlift and can transport litters during medical evacuations. The C-21A's turbofan engines are pod-mounted on the sides of the rear fuselage.

X Planes
The Bell X-1 rocket research plane was, of course, the world's first aircraft to break the 'sound barrier'Bell X-1 Rocket Plane - The Bell X-1 rocket research plane was, of course, the world's first aircraft to break the 'sound barrier'.

X-15 The X-plane with the longest and most successful career was North American's X-15.North American's X-15 - X-15 The X-plane with the longest and most successful career was North American's X-15.

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