Friday, March 31, 2006

Weather, Severe Storms Tornado

The first tornado captured by the NSSL doppler radar and NSSL chase personnel. The tornado is here in its early stage of formation. Image ID: nssl0064, National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) Collection, Location: Union City, Oklahoma, Photo Date: May 24, 1973, Credit: NOAA Photo Library, NOAA Central Library; OAR/ERL/National Severe Storms, Laboratory (NSSL).The first tornado captured by the NSSL doppler radar and NSSL chase personnel. The tornado is here in its early stage of formation. Image ID: nssl0064, National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) Collection,
Location: Union City, Oklahoma, Photo Date: May 24, 1973, Credit: NOAA Photo Library, NOAA Central Library; OAR/ERL/National Severe Storms, Laboratory (NSSL). NOAA Photo Library, photolib.noaa.gov/, HiResImage, High Resolution Photo Available - Click Here

Restrictions for Using NOAA Images, Most NOAA photos and slides are in the public domain and CANNOT be copyrighted.

Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Department of Commerce unless otherwise instructed to give credit to the photographer or other source.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Anyone incorporating a work of the U.S. Government into a copyrighted work should be aware of 17 U.S.C. § 403. This section requires a copyright notice to contain a statement identifying what portions of the work consist of a work of the U.S.Government.

Tornadoes are one of nature's most violent storms. In an average year, about 1,000 tornadoes are reported across the United States, resulting in 80 deaths and over 1,500 injuries. A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending from a thunderstorm to the ground. The most violent tornadoes are capable of tremendous destruction with wind speeds of 250 mph or more. Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long.

Tornadoes come in all shapes and sizes and can occur anywhere in the U.S. at any time of the year. In the southern states, peak tornado season is March through May, while peak months in the northern states are during the summer. Text Credit NOAA

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Weather, 1913 Horrors of Tornado Flood and Fire

Frontispiece to 'Horrors of Tornado Flood and Fire,' by Frederick E. Drinker. 1913. Image ID: libr0506, Treasures of the NOAA Library CollectionFrontispiece to "Horrors of Tornado Flood and Fire," by Frederick E. Drinker. 1913. An account of tornados, flooding and accompanying fires from Nebraska to New York in the year 1913. Image ID: libr0506, Treasures of the NOAA Library Collection. High Resolution Photo Available - Click Here.
NOAA Photo Library, http://www.photolib.noaa.gov/library/libr0506.htm

Restrictions for Using NOAA Images, Most NOAA photos and slides are in the public domain and CANNOT be copyrighted.

Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Department of Commerce unless otherwise instructed to give credit to the photographer or other source.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Great Lakes Storm of 1913, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Great Lakes Storm of 1913, historically referred to as the "Big Blow," the "Freshwater Fury," or the "White Hurricane," was a blizzard with hurricane-force winds that devastated the Great Lakes basin in the United States Midwest and the Canadian province of Ontario from November 7, 1913, to November 10, 1913.

The deadliest and most destructive natural disaster to ever hit the lakes1, the Great Lakes Storm killed over 250 people, destroyed 19 ships, and stranded 19 others. The financial loss in vessels alone was nearly US$5 million, or about $100 million in present-day adjusted dollars. The large loss of cargo, including coal, iron ore, and grain, meant short-term rising prices for consumer products throughout North America.

The storm originated as the convergence of two major storm fronts that was fuelled by the lakes' relatively warm waters, a seasonal process called a "November gale". It produced 90 mph (145 km/h) winds, waves over 35 feet (11 m) high, and whiteout snow squalls.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Great Lakes Storm of 1913.

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Women's History Month, Barbara Jordan

Congresswoman Barbara Jordan, head-and-shoulders portrait, possibly seated in a Congressional chamber, REPRODUCTION NUMBER:  LC-U9-32512-12, TITLE: [Congresswoman Barbara Jordan, head-and-shoulders portrait, possibly seated in a Congressional chamber] / [TOH]. CALL NUMBER: USN&WR COLL - Job no. 32512, frame 12 [P and P],
REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-U9-32512-12 (b and w film neg.), LC-DIG-ppmsc-01268 (digital file from original negative), No known restrictions on publication.

MEDIUM: 1 negative : film. CREATED, PUBLISHED: 1976 Apr. 7. CREATOR: O'Halloran, Thomas J., photographer.

NOTES: Title devised by Library staff. U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection. Contact sheet available for reference purposes. Contact sheet NOS 10-27-03

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, DIGITAL ID: (original) ppmsc 01268, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ , CARD #: 2003688128

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, [REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-U9-32512-12]

Barbara Jordan, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Barbara Charline Jordan (February 21, 1936 – January 17, 1996) was an American politician from Texas. She served as a member of Congress from 1973 to 1979.

Jordan was born in Houston, Texas's Fifth Ward. Jordan attended Wheatley High School and graduated magna cum laude from Texas Southern University in 1956 and from Boston University Law School in 1959. She passed the Bar Exams in Massachusetts and Texas before returning to Houston to open a law practice.

Jordan was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1994. It was only one of many honors given her, including election into both the Texas and National Women's Hall of Fame. On January 19, 1996, Jordan lay in state at the LBJ Library on the campus of The University of Texas at Austin. She was buried in the Texas State Cemetery in Austin, and was the first black woman interred there.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Barbara Jordan.

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Birds of Laysan









Walter Rothschild. The Avifauna of Laysan and the neighbouring islands with a complete history to date of the birds of the Hawaiian possession. 1893-1900 at the Smithsonian Institution.


Illustration Friday: SPRING


Watercolor on paper.

Ward's Words


I'm so pleased to have Mighty Ward Jenkins guest writing as we wrap up this week's look at Ads with 50's Storybook Styles.

But wait, did I say "wrap up"? As luck should have it, Dan Goodsell who started it all on monday graciously turned in an extra write-up for a late-breaking ad I felt was too perfect for him. Tune in this weekend for a "bonus track" at Today's Inspiration!

My biggest bearhug to all the kool kats who helped me out this week: Dan, Eric, Drazen, Steve and Ward - many thanks for a job very well done!

Art for the Domestic Goddess

I'd like to start off by giving Leif a big hearty thank you for allowing me offer my humble two cents to this week's Today's Inspiration theme. I think that this is a great idea and would love to see Leif do this more often. Like the others before me, I am in no way a true "historian" when it comes to this sort of thing. I simply love the illustrations and artwork from the mid-century era and love to talk about it. So, here goes....

I collect quirky ephemera from the 40's, 50's, and 60's. The more quirky, the better. One of my favorite things to collect are cookbooks, booklets, pamphlets, and any sort of paper item that is home and kitchen related that showcases fun and jovial illustrations. Most of these illustrations are small, but too the point -- simply adding illustrative garnish to what are usually dull and boring subjects: listings of ingredients and measurements for a multitude of recipes, or step-by-step guides for mundane household errands. And with what could be a synergistic element with the cookbooks and such, ads and articles in women's and family magazines often employed these same type of illustrations.

It's so easy to look back on all this and find these ads and cookbooks very amusing because of the naive and simplistic nature that the artwork
seemed to be trying to convey for that time. Every woman (and the occasional male chef) is grinning from ear to ear, completely full of gusto and glee and oh so very happy to be slaving away for their brood. And to top it off, every woman is wearing her favorite tea length dress while immersed with said slaving. Something to be said for style, I guess.
Looking back, it almost seems like subtle propaganda with ad agencies and household product manufacturers trying to make the "typical" housewife job seem easier than it really was. To take her mind off the fact that it's WORK that she's doing and that this is her destiny -- she should be HAPPY and filled with JOY that she's doing all this for her dear ol' hubby and munchkins. (A thankless job, no less.) Propagating an idealized home life with no worries, no stains, no odors to worry about.
There are some great examples here with the simple shapes, stylized characters, and childbook-like gaiety in all the poses and colors (even the black and white ads). But why on earth feature storybook illustrative styles into kitchen and home advertisements? Why, to lure in the next generation, of course. Making cooking and cleaning seem fun was a way to pull little Jane into the mix -- hook, line and sinker. Start 'em out early, I guess.

You can see some of my own ephemera collection in my Flickr sets: Fun Ephemera, and 1956 Home & Garden Decorating Book. Also, if you're into mid-century children's book illustrators, be sure to stop on by The Retro Kid. It's a swell thing.

The Cyanotype Work of Anna Atkins








While it's technically true to categorize the cyanotype (blueprint or photogram) as a form of photography, it seems to straddle the fence with printmaking although this may just be semantics.

In 1841 or so, Sir John Herschel disovered the sensitivity to light of a particular iron solution. When this chemical is dissolved in water, it can be applied to a surface such as paper and an object is placed on top and during exposure to uv light, the background goes blue ('Prussian blue') and a negative image of the object remains. Simple and cheap and still practised today by artists and school children.

Anna Atkins had a solid education in science and was a member of the Botanical Society of London. She developed the Herschel discovery as a means of producing illustrations of the plants in which she was interested, chiefly algae and ferns.
"The difficulty of making accurate drawings of objects as minute as many of the Algae and Con[i]fera, has induced me to avail myself of Sir John Herschel's beautiful process of Cyanotype, to obtain impressions of the plants themselves."
During the course of the 1840s Atkins produced more than 200 cyanotypes which were included in a 3 volume publication called Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions. It stands as the first publication to include images made from a photographic technique and Atkins herself is distinguished as being the first ever female photographer. (The first photograph was produced by Joseph Nicephore Niépce in ~1827)

Thursday, March 30, 2006

Women's History Month, Golda Meir

Golda Meir, REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-U9-27286-5, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs DivisionTITLE: Golda Meir, CALL NUMBER: USN&WR COLL - Job no. 27286, frame 5 [P and P], REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-U9-27286-5 (b and w film neg.), No known restrictions on publication. SUMMARY: Portrait, head and shoulders, facing right. MEDIUM: 1 negative : film. CREATED, PUBLISHED: 1973 March 1.
Digital ID: ppmsc 03265 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-U9-27286-5 (b&w film neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA Retrieve higher resolution JPEG version (84 kilobytes)

NOTES: Photo by Marion S. Trikosko. This record contains unverified data from "Famous People" reference aid. U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection. Contact sheet available for reference purposes.

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) ppmsc 03265, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/, CARD #: 2004672752

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, [REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-U9-27286-5]

Golda Meir, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Golda Meir (Hebrew: גּוֹלְדָּה מֵאִיר) Golda Mabovitz; May 3, 1898 – December 8, 1978) was one of the founders of the State of Israel. She served as the Minister of Labor, Foreign Minister, and as the fourth Prime Minister of Israel from March 17, 1969 to April 11, 1974. Golda Meir was the "Iron Lady" of Israeli politics years before the epithet was coined for Margaret Thatcher. David Ben-Gurion once described her as "the only man in the Cabinet." She is the first (and to date only) female Prime Minister of Israel, and was the third female Prime Minister in the world

She was born as Golda Mabovitz in Kiev in the Ukraine, then part of Imperial Russia, to Blume Naidtich and Moshe Mabovitz. She wrote in her autobiography that her earliest memories were of her father boarding up the front door in response to rumors of an imminent pogrom. Living conditions in the Pale of Settlement were tough; she and her two sisters (Sheyna and Tzipke) were often hungry and cold. Her other five siblings had died in their childhood. Golda especially looked up to Sheyna. Her father left for the United States in 1903. In the following years the rest of the family stayed in Pinsk and Golda's big sister Sheyna was engaged in Zionist-Revolutionary activity, which endangered her. It impressed young Golda very much and urged on the rest of the family to follow Moshe to the United States in 1906.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Golda Meir.

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More Ads with 50's Storybook Styles


I've uploaded another batch of Ads w/ 50's Storybook Styles and another guest writer , illustrator Steve Mack, shares his thoughts with us as we see a very concrete example of this week's topic: an ad drawn by reknowned 50's children's book illustrator J.P. Miller...

Mack on Miller


First a thank you to Leif for asking me to contribute a short write up on an artist I admire so much. Also, Thanks to the previous posters for enlightening me so far this week.

Above is the wonderful illustrated work of John Parr Miller. J.P. Miller has heavily influenced my style of illustration. I think it’s easy to see the charm of his work because his work is all about simple “charm”. He is a master designer, illustrator and craftsman. Every shape is considered (just look at that wonderful bucket) and every color is bright and powerful. To me his style is the benchmark of the Little Golden Book style. Though his illustrations seem deceptively simple it is never easy to boil down a subject. Ask any illustrator who has attempted this style. It involves refining and more refining to achieve that “simple” structure. This apparently did not come easy to J.P. Miller. He was a perfectionist with his work. His books were often turned in late past deadline so that he could achieve the level of quality he expected of himself. Some of his Golden Books are still in publication today and this serves as a testament to the long hours he spent “getting it right” and proving great illustrated design is timeless.

John Parr Miller 1913-2004

J.P. Miller links:

Cartoon Brew – A definitive write up On J.P. Miller from his Brother
Fun All Around – Eric Sturdevant’s collection and tributes
Jingle Bells A Golden Book by J.P. Miller – Some scans of mine from a cherished J.P. Miller Golden Book

Wednesday, March 29, 2006

ONE LOVELY DRAWING, part two


This jewel of a drawing by the great Robert Fawcett was a spot illustration for the story Mutiny in Paradise which appeared in This Week magazine in May 1957.

The original magazine was printed on cheap pulp paper, and most copies have long since crumbled into silt. I am posting a scan of the original so that this fine, arrogant drawing will continue to get the audience it deserves. Contrast Fawcett's use of drybush to convey the depth of the jungle outside the hut with the slashing brush strokes of the wall which energize the whole drawing.




Fawcett understood anatomy so well that he was able to depict the feet of the character with speed and confidence, despite their odd angle.



Most important, note how the subject matter was subordinated to the abstract design of the picture. Fawcett always said that the longer an artist could work on a representational drawing at the purely abstract level, the better.

Women's History Month, Mary Edwards Walker M.D.

"Let the generations know that women in uniform also guaranteed their freedom." ~ Mary Edwards Walker MD
Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, 1832-1919, REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-48794, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs DivisionTITLE: [Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, 1832-1919, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left, wearing man's top hat and coat], CALL NUMBER: BIOG FILE [item] [P and P], REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-48794 (b and w film copy neg.), No known restrictions on publication.
Digital ID: cph 3a48925 Source: digital file from b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-48794 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (1,769 kilobytes)

MEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED, PUBLISHED: [ca. 1911], NOTES: Photo by Bain News Service. Title and other information transcribed from unverified, old caption card data and item. George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published works before 1923 are now in the public domain

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

DIGITAL ID: (digital file from b and w film copy neg.) cph 3a48925, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/, CARD #: 2005685497

MARC Record Line 540 - No known restrictions on publication

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, [REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-48794]

Mary was the youngest of five daughters, followed by one son, born in Oswego NY to Alvah and Vesta Walker. Her father Alvah was a carpenter-farmer and abolitionist who believed in free thinking and many of the reform movements in the mid-1800s – including education and equality for his daughters, as well as dress reform (feeling their movements and abilities were impaired by the tight-fitting women’s clothing of the time). The girls provided farm labor, so their father did not expect them to wear restrictive corsets and such attire while working. He also intended all of his children to be educated and pursue professional careers. Women in History. Mary Edwards Walker. Lakewood Public Library

Mary Edwards Walker, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker (November, 1832 – February 21, 1919) was a feminist, abolitionist, prohibitionist, spy, prisoner of war, surgeon and the only woman to receive the Medal of Honor.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Mary Edwards Walker.

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Architectura Curiosa Nova Unplugged















"Georg Andreas Böckler was a German architect, engineer and author. He was the architect of the city of Nuremberg and specialized in hydraulic architecture. Architectura Curiosa Nova was his main opus, a four-part work in one volume, published in 1664.

Illustrated with 200 engravings, the decorative plates of the first three parts show the theory and application of hydrodynamics for fountains, water-jets, spray-patterns, garden fountains and well heads; and elaborate and often fanciful designs for free-standing fountains. The fourth part includes designs for grottoes, garden pavilions and architectural designs including views of European palaces."

It was my good fortune while fossicking around in the digital cloisters of the University of Heidelburg to discover that since my last post about Böckler's Architectura Curiosa Nova, the whole work has been posted online. It would never be described as understated. Many wedding cake decoration ideas within.

The image above the engraving with the statue carrying a trident was the only plate I saw (when I remembered to look) with an engravers name, but I can't make it out even using the pdf zoom capability at the site.

Part I, II, III, IV of Architectura Curiosa Nova.
nb. Part I of Architectura Curiosa Nova has quite a few pages of text and only a couple of images of piping diagrams; Part II has images of the fountain heads for the most part; Part III has both 'wall' variety and complete fountain images and Part IV concentrates on depicting some of the great houses of Europe and mazes.