Saturday, September 30, 2006

Science and Technology, SR-71 Blackbird

The SR-71, unofficially known as the "Blackbird," is a long-range, advanced, strategic reconnaissance aircraft developed from the Lockheed A-12 and YF-12A aircraft.
The first flight of an SR-71 took place on December 22, 1964, and the first SR-71 to enter service was delivered to the 4200th (later, 9th) Strategic Reconnaissance Wing at Beale Air Force Base, Calif., in January 1966.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Haggerty) This Web site is provided as a public service by the 95th Air Base Wing (Public Affairs).

Information presented on this Web site is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested. Highr Resolution Image
The Air Force retired its fleet of SR-71s on Jan. 26, 1990, because of a decreasing defense budget and high costs of operation. The Air Force returned the SR-71 to the active Air Force inventory in 1995 and began flying operational missions in January 1997.

The aircraft were permanently retired a few years later. Throughout its nearly 24-year career, the SR-71 remained the world's fastest and highest-flying operational aircraft. From 80,000 feet it could survey 100,000 square miles of Earth's surface per hour. On July 28, 1976, an SR-71 set two world records for its class: an absolute speed record of 2,193.167 miles per hour and an absolute altitude record of 85,068.997 feet.
SR-71 Blackbird, Edwards Air Force Base web siteThe Lockheed SR-71 remains one of the most exotic and mysterious aircraft of all time. Its mighty J58 engines, with a thrust equivalent to 45 diesel locomotives,
enable it to cruise for prolonged periods above Mach 3 and at altitudes in excess of 80,000 feet. Here one of the Blackbirds banks gently in its home skies over California's Mojave Desert. Note the Lockheed "Skunk Works" logo on its vertical stabilizer.

Information presented on Air Force Link is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested. Bell X-1, Edwards Air Force Base web site (EAFBWS).
AF.mil is provided as a public service by the Office of the Secretary of Air Force (Public Affairs).

Information presented on Air Force Link is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.
SR-71 Blackbird


RELATED: Sunday, June 19, 2005 C-5 Galaxy, Sunday, June 19, 2005 B-2 Spirit, Monday, June 20, 2005 B-52B, Tuesday, June 21, 2005 B-1 Lancer, Wednesday, June 22, 2005 U-2 Dragon Lady, Thursday, June 23, 2005 A-10 Thunderbolt II, Friday, June 24, 2005 F-117 Nighthawk, Saturday, June 25, 2005 F-15E Strike Eagle, Sunday, June 26, 2005 F-16C Fighting Falcon, Monday, June 27, 2005 F/A-22 Raptor, Tuesday, June 28, 2005 X-35, Joint Strike Fighter, Wednesday, June 29, 2005 CH-47 Chinook, Thursday, June 30, 2005 HH-60G Pave Hawk, Friday, July 01, 2005 MH-53J Pave Low IIIE, Saturday, July 02, 2005 UH-1N Huey, Sunday, July 03, 2005 E-3 Sentry, Monday, July 04, 2005 E-8C Joint STARS, Tuesday, July 05, 2005 RC-135U Combat Sent, Wednesday, July 06, 2005 CV-22 Osprey, Thursday, July 07, 2005 Air Force One, Friday, July 08, 2005 KC-10A Extender, Saturday, July 09, 2005 T-38 Talon, Sunday, July 10, 2005 T-6A Texan II, Monday, July 11, 2005 T-37 Tweet, Tuesday, July 12, 2005 T-43A Trainer, Wednesday, July 13, 2005 C-130 Hercules, Thursday, July 14, 2005 C-141 Starlifter, Friday, July 15, 2005 C-17 Globemaster III, Saturday, July 16, 2005 C-21A, Sunday, July 17, 2005 F-18 Hornet, Monday, July 18, 2005 E-2C Hawkeye, Tuesday, July 19, 2005 F-14D Tomcat, Wednesday, July 20, 2005 AV-8B Harrier II+, Thursday, July 21, 2005 UH-60L Blackhawk, Thursday, September 07, 2006 Science and Technology, North American's X-15, Sunday, September 03, 2006 Science and Technology, Bell X-1 Rocket Plane, Saturday, September 30, 2006 Science and Technology, SR-71 Blackbird

Famous Cigarette-Endorsing Artist

Try to imagine any national brand advertiser today thinking it would be a good idea to get an illustrator to endorse their product, since the public recognizes his name and loves his work. Its a highly unlikely scenario.

But it was a different world for the commercial artist of the 50's. Becoming a magazine illustrator was a very desirable goal - and not just for the paycheque. For the first half of the 20th century, illustrators were celebrities on par with stage and screen personalities, endorsing products, having articles written about them in mainstream magazines, and generally enjoying a kind of prominence in society that today's illustrator can only dream of.This ad for Fatima Cigarettes, featuring Jon Whitcomb serves to confirm that status once again. One has to imagine that the ad agency and their client considered many likely celebrity spokespeople; so for them to choose Jon Whitcomb suggests that they felt the public would know and admire him - which in fact is the case. Whitcomb was not only one of the most successful advertising and women's magazine story illustrators of the time, he also had a column in Cosmopolitan magazine called "Jon Whitcomb's Page" and of course, as the ad describes, he was a senior faculty member of the Famous Artists School, an art correspondence school that was so successful at the time that it made millionaires of all its founding members.

The mystery of Pall Mall illustrator Mal Murley is solved, thanks to a couple of people who went to the trouble of finding the information I was unable to locate: a biography and some other examples of his work can be found here. Thanks to bothJesse and Joe!

Finally, for those who would like to see many more scans of old cigarette ads, including many photo ads which I tend to ignore (this is, after all, an illustration blog) I recommend joining the excellent Flickr group Smooth Smoke Slogans that "Satisfy". You must get a free Flickr account and join the group to make many of the images visible due to an annoying Flickr rule.

Friday, September 29, 2006

Science and Technology, Avian influenza A H5N1

Avian influenza A H5N1, CDC/ Courtesy of Cynthia Goldsmith, Jacqueline Katz, and Sherif R. ZakiColorized transmission electron micrograph of Avian influenza A H5N1 viruses (seen in gold) grown in MDCK cells (seen in green). Avian influenza A viruses do not usually infect humans; however,
several instances of human infections and outbreaks have been reported since 1997. When such infections occur, public health authorities monitor these situations closely.

Content Providers(s): CDC/ Courtesy of Cynthia Goldsmith, Jacqueline Katz, and Sherif R. Zaki. Creation Date: 1997, Photo Credit: Cynthia Goldsmith, Links: CDC - Influenza (Flu) Information Page

Copyright Restrictions: None, This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

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Illustration Friday: QUIET

This little birdy
is quietly enjoying the beauty
of the night sky...

Watercolor on paper.

I'm posting this
for STUDIO FRIDAY as well,
this weeks theme is:
"Toot your own horn!" ...time to show off our work,
so I'll make some quiet noise here and share my watercolor art.
Have a wonderful and creative weekend everyone
and thank you for visiting!

March of the Cigarette-Smokin' Penguin

Its a sad story of the fleeting nature of fame, really...

Time was a little guy from the South Pole could come to America and make it big as the celebrity mascot of a major cigarette brand.As is often the case, modelling assignments can lead to acting gigs - sure the production quality wasn't that great - but a fella's gotta take his breaks where he can get 'em. The work was steady and required a guy who could stretch to fit many character types. It wasn't just about being a penguin month after month - no sir. But time passes and you can tell that tastes are changing. You're still on top, but you start to feel like you're second string to younger, more attractive competition.You can tell when its almost over... just like that, you're on the bottom; a bit player being squeezed out by hipper, more sophisticated types with a totally modern style. That's showbiz. Bah!

Thursday, September 28, 2006

Columbus Day

Columbus Day, American Forces Information ServicePrivacy & Security Notice The DoD Imagery Server is provided as a public service by the American Forces Information Service and the Defense Visual Information Directorate. Information presented on DoD Imagery Server is considered public information.
(High Resolution Image). (except where noted for government and military users logged into restricted areas) and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.
Columbus Day, American Forces Information ServiceAbout Images on DefenseLINK, All of these files are in the public domain unless otherwise indicated.However, we request you credit the photographer/videographer as indicated or simply "Department of Defense." >(High Resolution Image)
Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.
Credit line: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company CollectionDigital ID: det 4a27383 Source: digital file from intermediary roll film Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (123 kilobytes) . Credit line: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company Collection
Copyright and Restrictions
The Library of Congress is not aware of any U.S. copyright or any other restrictions in the photographs in this collection.

[Christopher Columbus]. CREATED, PUBLISHED, c1908. NOTES, Title devised by cataloger. "Hac est effigies liguris miranda Columbi antipodum primus rate qui penetravit in orbem" on painting. Detroit Publishing Co. no. 29258. Gift; State Historical Society of Colorado; 1949.

MEDIUM, 1 negative : glass ; 7 x 5 in. CALL NUMBER, LC-D418-29258, REPRODUCTION NUMBER, LC-D418-29258 DLC (b&w glass neg.), PART OF, Detroit Publishing Company Photograph Collection, REPOSITORY, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

DIGITAL ID (digital file from intermediary roll film) det 4a27383 hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/

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The Sweet Smoke: Pipe Tobacco


Its pretty hard to get mad at pipe smoke. Stinky cigar smoke, yes. Acrid cigarette smoke, of course. But pipe tobacco is... pleasant. A wiff of that apple and cherrywood blend conjures up cozy images of kindly older gents, idling away the hours in country stores. Other pipe aromas make one think of drawing rooms in English manors or woodshops, or...artist's studios!

I'll always remember the smell of pipe tobacco from my first visit to my friend, Will Davies' studio. You noticed it the minute you walked through the front door, even though Will's place was at the back, up a flight of stairs and a hundred feet down the hall. I remember being vaguely astonished by the heaping ashtray of spent tobacco on the low materials table by his drawing board.

Several years later, when I had joined that studio, Will mentioned in the course of conversation one day that his doctor had told him a while back to give up cigarettes, so he switched to a pipe and now allowed himself two bowls a day. "I'm thinking about cutting back to just one, in the afternoon," he said.

Cigarettes are indicative of modern society: mass-produced, packed and sealed, endlessly identical - and fast. An efficient drug delivery-system. Cigars are ostentatious, conspicuous in their demand for attention. They speak of an eff-you attitude, they're big, smell bad and last a long time, torturing everyone who has to endure their intrusion.

But pipes and pipe tobacco are all about individuality, contemplation; about pausing with purpose to fill, pack, light and draw on one's personal blend of aromatics. No wonder that, when you look back through history, from one culture to another all over the world, where smoking took place it was typically done with a pipe.

These comic strip ads for Yello-Bole pipes are funny and kind of hokey, but the art is worth a closer look, especially if you have an interest in comic strip advertising, as I do. You'll find all three of today's ads at full size in my Smoking Flickr set.

Wednesday, September 27, 2006

Science and Technology, Atoms Bonding

Atoms Bonding, Joseph Stroscio; Robert Celotta / NISTColorized version of an image created by the NIST custom-built scanning tunneling microscope as it drags a cobalt atom across a closely packed lattice of copper atoms. Download high-resolution version.
Large round features show the cobalt atom bonding to the copper at its preferred, lowest energy bonding site. Bright triangle-shaped areas show the atoms bonding at a higher energy site. The atom "screeches in protest" when the STM tip forces it to sit at this site. Dark areas show positions that the atom "hops" over, refusing to bond at all. Scientists Tame 'Hip Hop' Atoms FULL TEXT

Click here to hear "sounds" of hip hop atoms (You will need Real Player on your computer in order to view. Download Real Player free of charge at the Real.Com FreePlayer website.)

Use of NIST Information, These World Wide Web pages are provided as a public service by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). With the exception of material marked as copyrighted, information presented on these pages is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested. Image credit: Courtesy National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office

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SORRY, BUT MY RHINOCEROS DROWNED

Artists are most creative when they have to explain a missed deadline or a mistake in their artwork. This honorable tradition of excuses goes back as long as there have been artists. One of the best excuses came from Durer, an early illustrator.



The year was 1515, at the dawn of the Age of Exploration. Western civilization was awakening from centuries of medieval sleep, turning from superstition to the Scientific Revolution and the Renaissance. Durer was tasked with drawing a rhinoceros but unfortunately, nobody had ever seen a rhinoceros in Europe. It was an almost mythical beast described by travelers from exotic lands.

Explorers captured a rhinoceros in the far jungles of India. They strapped the great beast into a ship and sent it back to Europe. It was on its way to Italy, a gift to Pope Leo X, when the ship went down at sea.


What could Durer do? He never got to see the rhinoceros, so in the time honored tradition of illustrators everywhere, he faked it from a description and from a sketch in a letter. His drawing (above) was inaccurate in many ways but there was no one to contradict him, so Durer's drawing established the European concept of a rhinoceros for the next 250 years.

I sometimes think about that primordial beast, plucked from its home in the jungle and carried off to a new world. It was destined to become the most famous rhinoceros in history, although that wasn't much consolation when that storm came up at sea. The ship sank, taking the poor, uncomprehending beast down to a watery grave.

Western civilization would eventually improve its technique for studying wildlife. But in 1515, when cultures didn't quite come together-- when the past didn't quite connect with the future, east didn't connect with west, faith didn't connect with rational inquiry-- there stood an illustrator astride the cultures, bridging the gap.

Stubbed out





Half an hour after taking this shot, i got an email containing the picture below. Someone had spotted it in a gallery in brick lane. Not sure who the artist is... Great minds think alike / fools never differ?

Its A Psychological Fact:

Using cartoon characters in cigarette advertising attracts young smokers! I remember reading an article that detailed how, after the introduction of the Joe Camel character, teens started smoking Camels like crazy - a brand they had typically ignored.
But Joe was hardly the first Camels cartoon character. Back in 1955 Camels added these cartoon headers to their long-running series of "famous-people-who-smoke-Camels" ads.Whether this was actually a marketing strategy to attract young people to the brand is open to debate - but I doubt that was the case. Cartoon characters were being used for a great variety of adult-targeted products (much more so than they are today) and the Camels people probably thought these clever and colourful cartoons would contemporize their ads.There was certainly nothing appealing to youths about the old fogeys and generally grown up people featured in the much larger photo/endorsement section of the ads.

What I love about these Camels cartoons is the "radical" quality of the irate person who needs a good smoke: they really remind me of the work of retro-illustrator extraordinaire, Mitch O'Connell's work. If you want a closer look at all these ads, go to my Smoking Flickr set.

Tuesday, September 26, 2006

Science and Technology, Sir Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton, painted by Godfrey Kneller 1689Isaac Newton, painted by Godfrey Kneller 1689. The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain worldwide due to the date of death of its author, or due to its date of publication. Thus, this reproduction of the work is also in the public domain. This applies to reproductions created in the United States.
(see Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp.), in Germany, and in many other countries.
TITLE: Sir Isaac Newton, REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-10191, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division TITLE: Sir Isaac Newton, CALL NUMBER: FP - XVIII - M115 , no. 7 (A size) [P&P], REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-10191 (b&w film copy neg.), No known restrictions on publication in the U.S. Use elsewhere may be restricted by other countries' laws.
Digital ID: cph 3a52071 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-10191 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (1,578 kilobytes)

MARC LINE: 540 No known restrictions on publication in the U.S.

SUMMARY: Portrait, head and shoulders, facing right. MEDIUM: 1 print : mezzotint. CREATED/PUBLISHED: 1760.

NOTES: Mezzotint by James McArdell after Enoch Seeman. This record contains unverified, old data from caption card. Orig. in Hubbard Coll. 5415-11 "A".

REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3a52071, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ , CARD #: 2004672059

Isaac Newton was born in 1643 in Woolsthorpe, England. His father was a wealthy, uneducated farmer who died three months before Newton was born. Newton's mother remarried and he was left in the care of his grandmother. He attended Free Grammar school. Though Newton did not excel in school, he did earn the opportunity to attend Trinity College Cambridge where he wanted to study law.

His mother refused to pay for his education so while at college he worked as a servant to pay his way. Newton also kept a journal where he was able to express his ideas on various topics. He became interested in mathematics after buying a book at a fair and not understanding the math concepts it contained. Newton graduated with a bachelors degree in 1665.

The further pursuit of an education was interrupted by the plague. Trinity College was closed due to the highly contagious, deadly disease. Newton went home. It was during this time that Newton started to pursue his own ideas on math, physics, optics and astronomy. By 1666 he had completed his early work on his three laws of motion. The university reopened and Newton took a fellowship in order to obtain his masters degree. FULL TEXT

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Pall Mall & Mal Murley

What do you think - does this signature read "Mal Murley"? Its been bugging me for some time.A lot of illustrators worked on Pall Mall's long series of ads designed around this black, white and red theme; Stan Klimley and Paul C. Burns among them. But my favourites have always been done by an illustrator whom I think was named Mal Murley.I can't explain exactly why Murley's monochromatic paintings appeal so much more than others - there's just something really "rock-solid" about them. As pieces of commercial art I find them to be absolutely flawless.Beyond that unusual name, the artist has left no clues about the course of his career...

More often than not, when you find a signature on a piece of advertising art from the 50's, you'll likely see that name again as a credit line on story illustrations in the same magazines. But not only have I never come across a Murley editorial piece, I've never seen his name on any other ad art. Could he have been an in-house illustrator at Pall Mall?

Perhaps one day we'll find the answer. Currently, there's no biography of the artist to be found. For the time being we'll just have to "Reward Ourselves" by admiring the Mal Murley pieces in my Smoking Flickr set.

Monday, September 25, 2006

Science and Technology, Advanced Photon Source

image credit: U.S. Department of Energy Genomics:GTL Program, http://genomicsgtl.energy.gov.caption: Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.
image credit: U.S. Department of Energy Genomics:GTL Program.

For more on the science behind the Genomics:GTL Program, see Website. This image originally appeared in the 2001 Genomes to Life Program Roadmap.

Available Formats high resolution (tif, 11.56 MB) low resolution (jpg, 39 KB)

Image Use and Credits Almost all of the images on U.S. Department of Energy pages are original graphics created by the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program's Human Genome Management Information System (HGMIS). You will recognize these HGMIS images by their credit line (U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program or U.S. Department of Energy Genomics:GTL Program.) Permission to use these graphics is not needed, but please credit the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program or U.S. Department of Energy Genomics:GTL Program, the website ornl.gov/hgmis .

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

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Alba Amicorum

Pieter van Harinxma Coat of Arms

Pieter van Harinxma painting
Pieter Van Harinxma 1628-1630


Kunera van Douma 1605-1611
Kunera van Douma 1605-1611


Juliana de Roussel

Juliana de Roussel a

Juliana de Roussel b

Juliana de Roussel c

Juliana de Roussel d
Juliana de Roussel 1616-1645


Joost van Ockings 1576 carriageJoost van Ockings 1576

Joost van Ockings 1576 fountain
Joost van Ockings 1576


Juw Van Harinxma

Juw Van Harinxma a

Juw Van Harinxma b
Juw Van Harinxma 1625-1631


Homme Van Harinxma

Homme Van Harinxma a
Homme Van Harinxma jr 1625-1631


See previous post: 'Liber Amicorum', regarding a fully digitized 'Friendship Book' in a regional Dutch library.

The images above come from a collection of eleven 16th and 17th century Friendship Albums (Alba Amicorum) originating with the Van Harinxma thoe Slooten family of Friesland. The name of the book's owner and the dates between which contributions were made to the book are below each set of images.

The Dutch National Library have posted a number of example images from each album online. The majority of the entries are the Coats of Arms of the contributor together (often) with 'borrowed' or embellished mythological or historical scenes, many produced by local Frisian artists. [For instance, Caesar approaches the sepulchre of Alexander the Great in one image, whilst in another, the horse drawn carriage is a contemporary scene]

The dodgy translations of the site suggest that the albums vary both in the formal requirements of contributors and the nature of songs, inscriptions and poems added. They are said to provide interesting historical references about the relationships among the Frisian nobility and the student populations connected to the Van Harinxma thoe Slooten children.

Those Good Ol' Smoking Days!

Remember when smoking didn't kill you? When the worst thing you might experience from sucking on a coffin nail was some minor "throat irritation"?And all you had to do was ask your doctor about that. He wouldn't chastise you or make absurd suggestions like, "Maybe you should quit." Heck no! Why he'd actually recommend a smoother smoke - Try Viceroys, dear patient!Yes, smoking was in... all the cool kids were doing it! Moms and dads and sexy ladies were Being Happy and Going Lucky.This week, a look at those golden-leafed, Virginia-blended days of Smoking!

* I've got a nice little set of smoking ads you can see at full size here.