Monday, December 31, 2007

American Staffordshire Terrier

American Staffordshire TerrierI, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.
If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

The American Staffordshire Terrier's muscled build and protective instinct should make strangers beware, yet with their own family they are devoted, gentle and loving. A common question regarding the American Staffordshire Terrier is, "How is this breed different from the American Pit Bull Terrier?". In the eyes of the United Kennel Club, they are the same breed. American Staffordshire Terrier:

American Staffordshire Terrier From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The American Staffordshire Terrier is a medium sized dog that ranges from 40 to 50 cm (16 to 19 inches) at the withers, and weighs from 26 to 30 kg (57 to 67 pounds).

The dog is of square build, and gives the impression of great strength, agility, and grace for there size. They should be stocky, not long-legged or racy in outline. The chest is deep and broad, but should not be too wide. The neck should be strong, and well arched.

The coat is short and glossy. Any color, solid, parti, or patched is permissible, but all white, more than 80 per cent white, black and tan, and liver not to be encouraged.

These dogs should be courageous, tenacious, friendly, extremely attentive, and extraordinarily devoted.

Bred to be extremely friendly towards humans, American Staffordshire Terriers are not natural guard dogs. A lack of overly protective and/or aggressive behavior, accompanied by fearlessness, is generally a good sign. Such a dog is stable with children, and easily cared for by pet sitters.

These dogs learn quickly from the subtlest of our behaviors. They are thus not only highly responsive during training, but also pick up good habits for example, being house-trained. This can become a problem when an owner unknowingly allows the dog to pick up bad behaviors.

The American Staffordshire Terrier is a loyal,companion dog.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, American Staffordshire Terrier

Freedom Calendar 12/29/07 - 01/05/08 and Champagne Bottles and Fuel cells help make noisy, hot generators a thing of the past

Deco Vignettes

Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 f


Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 l


Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 k


Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 j



Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 e


Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 i


Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 h


Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 g



Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 d


Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 c


Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 b


Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922 a


Art Deco Vignettes - Henri Gillet 1922


Sunday, December 30, 2007

NASA - Hypersonic X-43A Scramjet Aircraft

NASA - Hypersonic X-43A Scramjet AircraftThis image (captured from animation video) illustrates the X-43A research vehicle alone after separation from the Pegasus booster. (LaRC Photo # EL-2000-00531) High Resolution Image
The X-43A was a small experimental research aircraft designed to flight-demonstrate the technology of airframe-integrated supersonic ramjet or "scramjet" propulsion at hypersonic speeds above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound. Its scramjet engine is an air-breathing engine in which the airflow through the engine remains supersonic.

Still Images, Audio Files and Video

NASA still images, audio files and video generally are not copyrighted. You may use NASA imagery, video and audio material for educational or informational purposes, including photo collections, textbooks, public exhibits and Internet Web pages. This general permission extends to personal Web pages.

If the NASA material is to be used for commercial purposes, especially including advertisements, it must not explicitly or implicitly convey NASA's endorsement of commercial goods or services. If a NASA image includes an identifiable person, using the image for commercial purposes may infringe that person's right of privacy or publicity. Dryden Aircraft Photo Collection

It's Official. X-43A Raises the Bar to Mach 9.6

Guinness World Records recognized NASA's X-43A scramjet with a new world speed record for a jet-powered aircraft - Mach 9.6, or nearly 7,000 mph. The X-43A set the new mark and broke its own world record on its third and final flight on Nov. 16, 2004.

In March 2004, the X-43A set the previous record of Mach 6.8 (nearly 5,000 mph). The fastest air-breathing, manned vehicle, the U.S. Air Force SR-71, achieved slightly more than Mach 3.2. The X-43A more than doubled, then tripled, the top speed of the jet-powered SR-71.

"Mach Number" was named after the Austrian physicist Ernst Mach. Mach 1 is the speed of sound, which is approximately 760 miles per hour at sea level. An airplane flying less than Mach 1 is traveling at subsonic speeds, faster than Mach 1 would be supersonic speeds and Mach 2 would be twice the speed of sound. Hypersonic X-43A Takes Flight

Freedom Calendar 12/29/07 - 01/05/08 and Champagne Bottles and Fuel cells help make noisy, hot generators a thing of the past

Saturday, December 29, 2007

Reineke Fuchs

Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) Titlepage (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p9 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p30 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p19 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) 49 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p29 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p31 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p34 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p39 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p36 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p44 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p38 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p42 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p48 (coconino)


Wilhelm von Kaulbach - Reineke Fuchs, 1857 (Goethe) p45 (coconino)


With roots stretching back to Aesop's Fables and the oral folk tradition, the allegorical tales of Reynard the Fox ('Reineke Fuchs') emerged in the 12th century as a storytelling convention, becoming conspicuously popular in Germany, France and Holland.

One of the common structural themes around which the assorted tales frequently revolved has the rogue hero Reynard outwitting a royal court when he is brought up on charges laid by other forest animals. Recurring characters include the wily Reynard, King Noble the lion, Isengrim the wolf, Bruin the bear, Baldwin the ass and Tibert (Tybalt) the cat.

Always humorous, often in verse form, the assortment of fables satirised the contemporary societies in which they were developed, resulting in "the subversion of certain kinds of serious literature, of political and religious institutions and practices, of scholarly argument and moralizing, and of popular beliefs and customs". The shameless and self-serving fox emerges as the peasant hero with his display of contempt for the upper classes. The anthropomorphic animals in the stories could of course be adjusted to symbolise real political or clerical figures or broad allegorical concepts to fit the prevailing mood as desired.

Germany's great writer, Wolfgang von Goethe, adapted a medieval version of Reynard the Fox to produce an epic poem in hexameter in 1794 - 'Reinecke Fuchs' - which is thought to have been influenced by the events of the French Revolution. German artist Wilhelm von Kaulbach produced an elaborate set of steel engravings in the 1840s (therefore, interestingly, he was a contemporary of JJ Grandville**) which were first published in the 1846 edition of 'Reinecke Fuchs'. The images above are derived from an 1857 facsimile edition. I can't imagine this was intended as a childrens book - there is some bawdy and fairly sophisticated imagery present, but maybe it's just my modern perspective/expectations and this was actually good and proper fare for a 19th century child (?).

**Brief searches revealed that a combined book of Grandville's classic 19th century anthropomorphic satire 'Les Metamorphoses du Jour' and Kaulbach's 'Reinecke Fuchs' series of illustrations was published at one stage. There was no indication that the two had met and I think that Kaulbach was the more famous artist, at least during the 1840s. [Grandville]

ONE LOVELY DRAWING, part 15

I can't think of a better way to end 2007 than with this lovely drawing by our old friend Rembrandt.



This little drawing makes me wonder why Franz Kline and Robert Motherwell thought it was necessary to invent abstract expressionism.  

What an astonishing drawing and what a wonderful world we live in!

Happy new year to all of you!

Holiday brunch

This holiday season
has been about giving thanks for all of this year's blessings,
relaxing, spending time with friends...
and doing a little crafting on the side :)
I recently made 4 very colorful patchwork table runners
inspired by a pattern in one of my Lotta Jansdotter books.

Hope you have a very happy
New Year!

Inspiration Typography

A type face that isnpired me for one typographic project of mine. Soon I'll post it to get some feedback. Tramyad font free for personal use from protofonts Download
download link fixed

Free Vectors

I found a great website for free vectors, you can also submit your own work and recieve feedback from other vector artists. "Vecteezy is an index of Free Vector Graphics available for download by some of the best artists around the world."

Champagne Bottles

I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.
If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

Champagne (wine) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Champagne is a sparkling wine produced by inducing the in-bottle secondary fermentation of wine to effect carbonation. It is produced exclusively within the Champagne region of France, from which it takes its name. While the term "champagne" is used by some makers of sparkling wine in other parts of the world, numerous countries limit the use of the term to only those wines that come from the Champagne appellation. In Europe, this principle is enshrined in the European Union by Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status. Other countries, such as the United States have recognized the exclusive nature of this name, yet maintain a legal structure that allows longtime domestic producers of sparkling wine to continue to use the term "Champagne" under specific circumstances.

Wines from the Champagne region were known before medieval times. Churches owned vineyards and monks produced wine for use in the sacrament of Eucharist. French kings were traditionally anointed in Reims and champagne wine was served as part of coronation festivities.

Kings appreciated the still, light, and crisp wine, and offered it as an homage to other monarchs in Europe. In the 17th century, still wines of Champagne were the wines for celebration in European countries. The English were the biggest consumers of Champagne wines.

The first commercial sparkling wine was produced in the Limoux area of Languedoc about 1535. Around 1700, sparkling Champagne, as we know it today, was born. There is documentary evidence that sparkling wine was first intentionally produced by English scientist and physician Christopher Merrett at least 30 years before the work of Dom Perignon who, contrary to legend and popular belief, did not invent sparkling wine.

Although the French monk Dom Perignon did not invent champagne, it is true he developed many advances in the production of this beverage, including holding the cork in place with a wire collar to withstand the fermentation pressure. It is believed champagne was created accidentally, yet others believe that the first champagne was made with rhubarb but was changed because of the high cost.

Champagne is mostly fermented in two sizes of bottles, standard bottles (750 mL), and magnums (1.5 L). In general, magnums are thought to be higher quality, as there is less oxygen in the bottle, and the volume to surface area favors the creation of appropriately-sized bubbles. However, there is no hard evidence for this view. Other bottle sizes, named for Biblical figures, are generally filled with Champagne that has been fermented in standard bottles or magnums.

Sizes larger than Jeroboam (3.0 L) are rare. Primat sized bottles (27 L) - and as of 2002 Melchizedek sized bottles (30 L) - are exclusively offered by the House Drappier. The same names are used for bottles containing wine and port; however Jeroboam, Rehoboam and Methuselah refer to different bottle volumes. On occasion unique sizes have been made for special occasions and people, the most notable example perhaps being the 20 fluid ounce / 60 cL. bottle (Imperial pint) made specially for Sir Winston Churchill by Pol Roger. In order to see a side-by-side comparisen, see this site: Champagne sizes

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Champagne (wine)

Ron Paul New TV Ad: ‘Defender of Freedom’ VIDEO and Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) and Ames Laboratory researchers solve fuel-cell membrane structure conundrum

Friday, December 28, 2007

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)Western Diamondback Rattlesnake USFWS Photo by Jim Rorabaugh Arizona Ecological Services Field Office All images are for public use, but please credit the photographer and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.
Disclaimer from US Fish and Wildlife Service: Most of the images on our Web pages are in the "public domain," (THIS IMAGE) which means they have no copyright restrictions. If an image on one of our sites is not restricted and does not say it is copyrighted, then you can assume it is in the public domain. You may download and use these copyright-free images in your print and electronic publications.

There is no fee and no need to get permission from the Service for using them. Images in the public domain may credit the artist or photographer, or identify the source (example: Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Robert Wilson). This does not mean the image is copyrighted. But please credit the artist or photographer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if at all possible.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Crotalus atrox From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Common names: western diamondback rattlesnake, Texas diamond-back, Crotalus atrox is a venomous pitviper species found in the United States and Mexico. It is likely responsible for the majority of snakebite fatalities in northern Mexico and the second greatest number in the USA after C. adamanteus. No subspecies are currently recognized.

Adults commonly grow to 120 cm in length. Specimens over 150 cm are infrequently encountered, while those over 180 cm are very rare. The maximum reported length considered to be reliable is 213 cm (Klauber, 1972). Males become much larger than females, although this difference in size does not occur until after they have reached sexual maturity.

The color pattern generally consists of a dusty looking gray-brown ground color, but it may also be pinkish brown, brick red, yellowish, pinkish or chalky white. This ground color is overlaid dorsally with a series of 24-25 dorsal body blotches that are dark gray-brown to brown in color. The first of these may be a pair of short stripes that extend backwards to eventually merge. Some of the first few blotches may be somewhat rectangular, but then become more hexagonal and eventually take on a distinctive diamond shape. The tail has 2-8 (usually 4-6) black bands separated by interspaces that are ash white or pale gray. There is a postocular stripe that is smoky gray or dark gray-brown and extends diagonally from the lower edge of the eye across the side of the head. This stripe is usually bordered below by a white stripe running from the upper preocular down to the supralabials just below and behind the eye

Found in the United States from central Arkansas and southeastern California, south into Mexico as far as northern Sinaloa, Hidalgo and northern Veracruz. Disjunct populations exist in southern Veracruz and southeastern Oaxaca. The type locality given is "Indianola" (Indianola, Calhoun County, Texas, USA).

In the United States it occurs in the following states: central and western Arkansas, Oklahoma excluding the northeast, north-central region and the panhandle, Texas excluding the northern panhandle and the east, southern and central New Mexico and Arizona, extreme southern Nevada, and in southeastern California on either side of the Chocolate Mountains. Records from extreme southern Kansas (Cowley and Sumner Counties) may be based on a natural occurrence of the species, while multiple records from near Kanopolis Reservoir in Ellsworth County seem to indicate a viable (although isolated) population.

In Mexico it occurs in the following states: Nuevo León, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Sonora, extreme northeastern Baja California (state), northern Sinaloa, northeastern Durango, Zacatecas, most of San Luis Potosí, northern Veracruz, Hidalgo and Querétaro. Specimens have been collected in the mountains, northwest of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca on numerous occasions, but have not been reported there since the 1940s.

This species has also been reported on a number of islands in the Gulf of California, including San Pedro Mártir, Santa María (Sinaloa), Tíburon and the Turner Islands.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Crotalus atrox

Benazir Bhutto Biography and Gila Monster (Heloderma suspectum) and Explosives at the microscopic scale produce shocking results VIDEO

Thursday, December 27, 2007

Vector Convert (Suggestion)

Most of the brushes for Adobe Photoshop can be easily converted to vector objects with the help of Illustrators, the Live Trace feature .

Photoshop Brushes are actually information about grayscale shapes, all you have to is to use them once in a blank document, export them as a jpeg, gif or png file , and then load it with Illustrator (File > Place).

The final step is to select the loaded file and go Object>Live Trace.
Note: The Live Trace Feature is avalable in Adobe Illustrator CS2 and CS3. You can also take a quick look at "Producing creative drawings with Live Trace and Live Paint"

Urban Scrawl Brush set for Photoshop

Here is a good proposal if you would like to apply grungy/sketchy style to your digital artwork.

This Photoshop brush set contains 29 different hand-drawn shapes. Feel free to experiment with different colors and layer transparency.

Author - InvisibleSnow Download from here



Gila Monster (Heloderma suspectum)

Gila Monster USFWS Photo by Jim Rorabaugh Arizona Ecological Services Field Office All images are for public use, but please credit the photographer and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Disclaimer from US Fish and Wildlife Service: Most of the images on our Web pages are in the "public domain," (THIS IMAGE)
which means they have no copyright restrictions. If an image on one of our sites is not restricted and does not say it is copyrighted, then you can assume it is in the public domain. You may download and use these copyright-free images in your print and electronic publications.

There is no fee and no need to get permission from the Service for using them. Images in the public domain may credit the artist or photographer, or identify the source (example: Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Robert Wilson). This does not mean the image is copyrighted. But please credit the artist or photographer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if at all possible.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Gila Monster From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Gila Monster (pronounced /ˈhiːlə/, HEE-la), Heloderma suspectum, is a species of venomous lizard native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. It is a heavy, slow moving lizard, up to 60 cm (2 feet) long, and is the most venomous lizard native to the USA. Its skin has the appearance of black, pink, orange, and yellow beads, laid down in intricate patterns. These beads are small bony plates that form scales, and are known as osteoderms. Until very recently, it was thought to be one of only two species of venomous lizard, the other being its close relative the Mexican beaded lizard. However research at the University of Melbourne, Australia and Pennsylvania State University has revealed that in fact many lizards in the iguanian and monitor families have venom-producing glands.

The name "Gila monster" refers to the Gila River Basin in Arizona. The generic name for Heloderma is from the Greek words Helos coming from the head of a nail or stud, and derma for skin, therefore Heloderma means studded skin. Suspectum comes from Cope's notion that the lizard might be venomous due to the grooves in the teeth.

Unlike snakes which use hollow upper teeth (fangs), the Gila monster injects venom into its victim through grooves in the teeth of its lower jaw. The teeth are loosely anchored, which allows them to be broken off and replaced throughout their lives. The Gila monster produces only small quantities of its neurotoxic venom, which is secreted into the lizard's saliva. By chewing its prey, however, it tries to put as much of the venom into the bloodstream of its victim as possible. The Gila monster's bite is normally not fatal to humans (there are no confirmed reports of fatalities), but it can bite quickly and holds on tenaciously. When Gila Monsters bite, they hold on tightly and chew. This helps them work their venom into the bite. Gila Monster bites are not deadly, but it is important to see a doctor if bitten.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Gila Monster

President Bush calls to members of the Armed Forces and Benjamin Franklin and Using carbon nanotubes to seek and destroy anthrax toxin and other harmful proteins VIDEO

Wageningen Wall Charts

Bees - Zoological Wallcharts 1900-1950


Beetles - Zoological Wallcharts 1900-1950


De Koe (cow) by HM Kroon 1912


Cow - Zoological Wallcharts 1900-1950


De Koe (cow) by HM Kroon 1912 a


De Koe (cow) by HM Kroon 1912 c


De Koe (cow) by HM Kroon 1912 d


De Koe (cow) by HM Kroon 1912 b


Fish - Zoological Wallcharts 1900-1950


Het paard (The Horse) by EA Quadekker 1910 a


Het paard (The Horse) by EA Quadekker 1910 c


Het paard (The Horse) by EA Quadekker 1910


Het paard (The Horse) by EA Quadekker 1910 b


Duck - Zoological Wallcharts 1900-1950


Bird - Zoological Wallcharts 1900-1950


The images above [sans watermarking] are from:
--H.M. Kroon: 'De koe : groot model (half levensgroot)' [1912?] {cow}
--E.A. Quadekker: 'Het paard : groot model (half levensgroot)' [1910?] {horse}
--Zoological and entomological wallcharts : varia. [1900-1950?]

These are among the Historic Biology and Animal Science Online collection from the Special Collections at Wangeningen UR Digital Library in Holland.

Previously:
*Dutch Botanical Wall Charts 1870-1960
*Old German Zoological Charts
*19th Century Science Wall Charts