Monday, April 30, 2007

Bronzino Venus, Cupid, Folly and Time

Bronzino Venus, Cupid, Folly and TimeThis image is a faithful reproduction of a two-dimensional work of art and thus not copyrightable in itself in the U.S. as per Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp.; the same is also true in many other countries, including Germany. The original two-dimensional work shown in this image is free content because: This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, Canada, the European Union and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years. High Resolution Image
Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain. (Free for commercial use)

Bronzino, Venus, Cupid, Folly, and Time, c. 1545 Oil on panel, 5 ft 1 in x 4 ft 8 3/4 in (London, National Gallery of Art)

Around 1545, Agnolo Tori, called Bronzino (1503-72), painted a complex verbal allegory usually referred to as Venus, Cupid, Folly, and Time. It displays the ambivalence of the Mannerist period in life and art. It also illustrates the Mannerist taste for obscure imagery with erotic overtones. Da Vinci's Code

Venus, Cupid, Folly and Time From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Venus, Cupid, Folly, and Time is an allegorical painting by the Florentine artist Agnolo Bronzino.

Around 1545, Bronzino was commissioned to create a painting which has come to be known as Venus, Cupid, Folly, and Time. It displays the ambivalence, eroticism and obscure imagery which is characteristic of the Mannerist period. Bronzino, who studied with Pontormo, painted in the highly etched and sculptural manner of Florentines.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article, Venus, Cupid, Folly and Time

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Canadian Illustration in the 50's

Last week's look at Canadian illustrator Oscar Cahén had me flipping through my small collection of old Maclean's, Chatelaine and Canadian Home Journal magazines.

I had forgotten how much I liked the work of the Canadian illustrators of the 50's and so I thought this week it might be fun to introduce you to some of these artists - mostly unknown to even those well versed in the illustration industry of the period.

So let's begin with an artist who had very close ties to Oscar Cahén...

Jack Bush (1909-1977)

Jack Bush's illustration style was perhaps the most "commercial" of the illustrators who participated in The Painters Eleven group of Canadian abstract expressionists.


His regular contributions to Canada's major magazines reveal deep roots in the advertising art market, going back to the 1930's, when Bush ran a commercial art business.


Some of his editorial work from the early 1950's might begin to hint at his interest and eventual immersion in the exploration of Colourfield Painting and Lyrical Abstraction.


Personally, I find Bush's bold and slightly simplified approach to classically realistic illustration very appealing. Though commercial art was ultimately not as artistically satisfying for Bush as his fine art efforts...


...his illustrations provide an interesting counterpoint to the abstract work for which he gained international reknown.


You can see all of these images at full size in my Jack Bush Flickr set.

Sunday, April 29, 2007

This Day in History Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc, Saint, 1412-1431, Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-121205, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs DivisionTITLE: [Joan of Arc, three-quarter length portrait, standing in field, facing front, clutching sword to chest], CALL NUMBER: BIOG FILE - Joan of Arc, Saint, 1412-1431 [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-121205 (b&w film copy neg.) MEDIUM: 1 photographic print. CREATED, PUBLISHED: c1920.
Digital ID: cph 3c21205 Source: b&w film copy neg. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-121205 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA Retrieve higher resolution JPEG version (108 kilobytes) Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (12 megabytes)

NOTES: G60288 U.S. Copyright Office. Photograph of painting. REPOSITORY: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. DIGITAL ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3c21205 hdl.loc.gov/cph.3c21205 . CARD #: 99401200

This image is a faithful reproduction of a two-dimensional work of art and thus not copyrightable in itself in the U.S. as per Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp.; the same is also true in many other countries, including Germany.The original two-dimensional work shown in this image is free content because: This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 are now in the public domain.

At the age of 16, "voices" of Christian saints told Joan to aid Charles, the French dauphin, in gaining the French throne and expelling the English from France. Convinced of the validity of her divine mission, Charles furnished Joan with a small force of troops. She led her troops to Orleans, and on April 29, as a French sortie distracted the English troops on the west side of the city, Joan entered unopposed by its eastern gate. 1429 : Joan of Arc relieves Orleans

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Saturday, April 28, 2007

Ships and Boats HMS Bounty

The HMS Bounty visits Portsmouth Harbor, Summer 1999. USCG Station Portsmouth HarborThis Day in History 04/28/1789 : Mutiny on the HMS Bounty

Three weeks into a journey from Tahiti to the West Indies, the HMS Bounty is seized in a mutiny led by Fletcher Christian, the master's mate. Captain William Bligh and 18 of his loyal supporters were set adrift in a small, open boat, and the Bounty set course for Tubuai south of Tahiti. HMS Bounty

Ownership Information (THIS IMAGE) presented on this web site (USCG Station Portsmouth Harbor) in the non-logged in domain is considered public information and may be distributed or copied.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

HMS Bounty, British armed transport ship remembered for the mutiny of its crew on April 28, 1789.

Commanded by Capt. William Bligh, it had sailed to Tahiti, taken on a cargo of breadfruit trees, and traveled as far as the Friendly Islands (Tonga) on the voyage to Jamaica when it was seized by the master's mate, Fletcher Christian. HMS Bounty

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THE LATEST NEWS FROM THE DISTANT PAST

Holland Carter once wrote, "I go to museums to get the latest news from the distant past."

There's no better place to look for news than in the changing depictions of the human form. Artists have been drawing the human body for over 20,000 years and while the body has remained the same, the drawings keep changing.

Every pose, angle, and facial expression has been drawn a thousand times by talented artists. Look at these figure drawings by the great Annibale Carracci in the 16th century:







Who would have the nerve to continue drawing the figure after Carracci if there was no new information to convey? What could another drawing possibly contribute?

The fact is, while the human form remains unchanged, each era presents fresh questions for the artist. And even when the question remains the same, the answers continue to change. Look at all the news in this wonderful drawing by Aubrey Beardsley.



Or contrast Carracci's drawings with these recent images by the talented Phil Hale:







The muscles, bones, arms and legs are the same-- and yet what a difference!



If our bodies were merely machines, they would not be a source of infinite fascination for artists. As it is, artists keep returning to the human form for fresh news about our humanity.

Friday, April 27, 2007

Before the Deluge

"The observer who glances over a rich and fertile plain, watered by rivers and streams which have, during a long series of ages, pursued the same uniform and tranquil course; the traveller who contemplates the walls and monuments of a great city, the first founding of which is lost in the night of ages, testifying, apparently, to the unchangeableness of things and places; the naturalist who examines a mountain or other locality, and finds the hills and valleys and other accidents of the soil in the very spot and condition in which they are described by history and tradition - none of these observers would at first suspect that any serious change had ever occurred to disturb the surface of the globe. Nevertheless, the earth has not always presented the calm aspect of stability which it now exhibits; it has had its convulsions, and its physical revolutions, whose story we are about to trace."

Earth in a gaseous state
'The Earth in a gaseous state circulating in space'



Landscape of the Silurian Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Silurian Period'



Landscape of the Devonian Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Devonian Period'



marine life in the Carboniferous Period
'Ideal view of marine life in the Carboniferous Period'



forest in the Coal Period
'Ideal view of a marshy forest in the Coal Period'



Landscape of the Permian Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Permian Period'



Landscape of the Muschelkalk Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Muschelkalk Period'



Landscape of the Saliferous or Keuper Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Saliferous or Keuper Period'



Ichthyosaurus and Plesiosaurus
'Ideal Scene of the Lias Period with Ichthyosaurus and Plesiosaurus'



Landscape of the Liassic Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Liassic Period'


Landscape of the Lower Oolite Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Lower Oolite Period'



Landscape of the Middle Oolite Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Middle Oolite Period'



Scene of the Lower  Cretaceous Period
'Ideal Scene of the Lower Cretaceous Period'



Landscape of the Cretaceous Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Cretaceous Period'



Landscape of the  Eocene Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Eocene Period'



Landscape of the Pliocene Period
'Ideal Landscape of the Pliocene Period'



Wooly Mammoth in the St. Petersburg Museum
'Skeleton of the Mammoth in the St. Petersburg Museum'



Quaternary Epoch -- Europe
'Ideal View of the Quaternary Epoch -- Europe'



Deluge of the North of Europe
'Deluge of the North of Europe'



Appearance of Man
'Appearance of Man'


"The object of "The World before the Deluge" is to trace the progressive steps by which the earth has reached its present state, from that condition of chaos when it "was without form and void, and darkness was upon the face of the the deep," and to describe the various convulsions and transformations through which it has successively passed."

'The World Before the Deluge' by Louis Figuier (1872 revision of the 1862 text) is online at 19th century science.

****UPDATE: A full (and better quality) 1863 edition of this book has now been uploaded by Strasbourg Digital Library.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
I've been more than a little busy this week. In other news...
  • The Library of Congress have a blog.
  • Brian Sawyer (Craftzine, Makezine) has a blog - bookbinding and craft.
  • The only thing I've seen at the British Library's 'Sacred' online gallery is an exquisite Ethiopian bible in the Turn the Pages section (I haven't quite worked out yet what exactly is 'new' here).
  • 'Discover Islamic Art in the Mediterranean' contains >600 artefacts from 14 countries in 18 exhibition sites, assembled by 90 curators from the productive output of 1200 years. (multiple languages) For each exhibition site, click the 'more information' and any other links around to find everything available. (first appearances are a little deceptive).
  • Revolutionary Players is another vast site I've hardly looked at "focusing on the history of the Industrial Revolution in the West Midlands in Britain between the years 1700 and 1830." [via]

Baseball Stadium

San Diego Padres Photo by: Pvt. Charlie Chavez USMCMarine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego personnel attended a weekend at Petco Park Sept. 17-18. The San Diego Padres donated tickets to the USO to distribute to military organizations thought the city.
Photo by: Pvt. Charlie Chavez. Photo ID: 2005923112459, Submitting Unit: MCRD San Diego. Photo Date:09/23/2005. This Image has been cleared for release. High Resolution Image

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

TEAM OF THE MILITARY: Military Opening Night Presented by Northrop Grumman Corporation, Saturday April 7 at 7:05 p.m. - Padres vs. Colorado, The Padres' tradition of saluting the Military continues with the only Military Opening Night in all of Major League Baseball on Saturday, April 7. The Padres will once again wear their desert camouflage jerseys as a visible salute to all members of the Armed Forces and pre-game ceremonies will honor distinguished members of local Military commands.

Marine Recruit Sundays Presented by Navy Federal Credit Union, the Padres are proud to host 13 graduating classes from Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Sunday games at PETCO Park. The Official Site of The San Diego Padres

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Illustration Friday: REMEMBER

Watercolor on paper
baked fresh for today's Illustration Friday.

AMAZING FACT:
Birds remember exactly where they've hidden
thousands of seeds each autumn and find their way back
to their stashes using the sun, stars, landmarks
and sometimes the magnetic pull of the earth
to guide them.

Click on the image to see it
BIGGER!

Have a beautiful weekend friends.

Oscar Cahén, Fine Artist

In the late 80's, actor Peter Ustinov described Toronto as "New York run by the Swiss". In the early 50's you might have said Toronto was like Newark run by the British. Torontonians worked hard, wore dark suits and could not buy tobacco on Sundays. It was a town that rolled up the sidewalks at dusk and liked it that way.

Into this unlikely environment came a maverick artist and his gang of unruly compatriots.

The last notable movement in Canadian art had been the international success of The Group of Seven and the culture had been stuck in a rut of artistic tradionalism ever since. According to artist Graham Coughtry, “every damn tree in the country has been painted.”

In 1953, Oscar Cahén...


...along with Jack Bush...


...Harold Town...

..and several others decided to form a new collective, Painters Eleven, in an effort to give the Toronto art scene a “blood transfusion”.


In Robert Fulford's introduction to Magnificent Decade: The Art of Harold Town, 1955-1965, the author writes of Oscar Cahén, "by the time Painters Eleven formed, Cahén--now thirty-seven years old--had turned to abstractions in brilliant and unexpected colours. It was this startling palette that set him apart from his ten colleagues, and indeed from all painters in Canada. He had learned how to place one colour beside another in a way that produced unusual intensities."


When we juxtapose one of Cahén's abstracts against one of his illustrations from around the same period, it is not very difficult to see the same playful inventiveness at work. Cahén's artwork must have had a powerfully energizing effect on all who it touched in those otherwise dreary times.


On November 26th, 1956, Oscar Cahén was killed in a car crash near his home in Oakville. He was 40 years old.


In 1968, Karl Nickel, writing for The Ringling Museum of Art's exhibit,Oscar Cahén: First American Retrospective Exhibition, said "Such men speak clearly for their times, hurrying, even speeding through life and through brilliant accomplishments to an early and violent death. Any exhibition of Cahén’s work... gives a sense not only of great and lasting achievement, but also of tragically unfulfilled promise."


And the famous Canadian illustrator, James Hill, said, "As a young impressionable illustrator, you had to approach his work with caution, lest it grab you by the scruff of young innocence and inexperience and lead you in directions your inner light was guiding along other paths. You had to be nimble to avoid being constantly in the shadow of Oscar’s talent."


Most of the information and some of this week's images are from The Cahén Archives. Please visit the site for more artwork, photos and information about this great Canadian artist.

All of this week's images and information are © The Cahén Archives.

Thursday, April 26, 2007

This Day in History Dr. Jonas Salk

his Day in History Dr. Jonas Salk, content provider, Centers for Disease ControlOn this day in 1954 (04/25/07) field trials for the Salk vaccine begin at the Franklin Sherman Elementary School in McLean Virginia.

April 12, 2005, marked the 50th anniversary of the announcement that the polio vaccine, developed by Dr. Jonas Salk and his team of scientists at the University of Pittsburgh, was a success. "Safe, effective, and potent", were the words used to announce to the world that an effective vaccine had been found against a disease that once paralyzed 13,000--20,000 people each year in the United States alone.
Content Providers: CDC. ID#: 7356. Copyright Restrictions: None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited.

Description: Standing at the podium during his 1988 Centers for Disease Control visit, this photograph showed Dr. Jonas Salk, creator of the first polio vaccine in 1955, fielding questions during his presentation.

Links: CDC - National Immunization Program – 50th Anniversary of the First Polio Vaccine

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Last weeks of april

Journaling: at the beggining of the week, lots of empty space...
Now: full of scribbles :o)
and gone is april....swoosh!
I'm ready for all the
may flowers.

Done with my kid's markers
and ink.