Sunday, November 30, 2008

Christmas Toys Lord and Taylor Holiday Window

Christmas Toys Lord and Taylor Holiday Window

Christmas Toys Lord and Taylor Holiday Window
Christmas Toys Lord and Taylor Holiday Window. Christmas Toys come to life in Lord and Taylor's annual holiday window.A Jack in the Box take center stage at the flagship store, 424 Fifth Avenue New York City.

Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.


If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

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Vector Christmas Trees

A collection of three abstract Christmas Trees by mariannasm. The illustrations are in Adobe Illustrator and Corel Draw file formats. Perfect for designing a Christmas card or a wallpaper...

To use the resource first, you need to expand the .zip file. Download

The Desperate Neighborhood



Bringing you all the gossip going on in the Bead Blogging World....

About.com Jewelry Making
Tammy's drooling over the big and beautiful cloisonne beads.

Art Bead Scene Inspired by Steam
Art Bead Scene picks for Steampunk Style.

Art Jewelry Magazine
A holiday gift to you: a sale on downloadable patterns from BeadStyle, Bead&Button, and Art Jewelry magazines.

Barbe Saint John - New Jewelry from Forgotten Artifacts
Getting to know Barbe - 7 random facts!

Jennifer Jangles Blog
It's time to get started on those Holly - day projects, here's one from Jennifer.

Jewelry & Beading
Cyndi has rounded up a few fast and easy projects from some of her favorite suppliers.

Naughty Secretary Club
See what fun baubles Jen and her collage artist buddy Traci Bautista come up with this week. Hint: there are vintage cupcake toppers, chunky plastic chain and fabric involved!

Strands of Beads
Melissa is inspired by astrolabes and orreries to create a pendant from a beautiful lampworked bead.

The Writing and Art of Andrew Thornton
Magic Words – Text-based jewelry components can be a great source of inspiration. Andrew investigates these worded beads and pendants in six new designs.


Have you heard any good dirt in the beading world? We'd love for you to share!

Gossiped...errr...reported by Cindy Gimbrone, The Desperate ABS Editor and glass beadmaker.

Saturday, November 29, 2008

Christmas Two Toy Soldiers

Christmas Two Toy SoldiersA toy soldier guards a window scene from the yearly Lord and Taylor holiday Christmas decorations, at 5th avenue and 39th street New York City November 26, 2008

Christmas Two Toy SoldiersA toy soldier overlooking the skating rink at Rockefeller Center, part of the annual holiday, Christmas decorations that include the famous Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree New York City November 24, 2008
Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

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Hugo Create

HUGO Fragrances invites emerging talents from all-over the world to participate in HUGO Create, a creative contest. HUGO Create is open to graphic design, illustration and photography. 
The main aim of the HUGO Create design challenge is to stir up creativity and to create a high-profile platform for emerging talents. More

Spanner Brushes for Adobe Illustrator

A collection of spanner brushes for Adobe Illustrator from r2010. Perfect for creating abstract vector backgrounds, patterns swatches or custom decoration of your vector artwork. 

Download Click on the image below for detailed preview.

Retro Colors

An inspirational color palette that I found while researching retro color themes for a project that I'm currently working on. The palette is available for download here. Just have in mind that you need to register a ColourLovers.com account in order to access the download links.

Studio Saturday - Unlikely Inspiration

Welcome to Studio Saturday! Each week one of our contributors gives you a sneak peek into their studio, creative process or inspirations. We ask a related question of our readers and hope you'll leave comments! As an incentive we offer a free prize each week to bribe you to use that keyboard. The following week we choose a random winner. This week's winner is Meekiyu! Congratulations! Please send your postal address to the ABS Suggestion Box to receive some buttons from Creative Impressions in Clay!


It's been a while since you've been over to the Humblebeads Studio. This has been a busy month of new beads for me as I prepare to launch a new line of beads. One bead that has snuck out early are my Illuminated Manuscript beads, inspired by the Renaissance.

I'm not much for monograms, but while designing this new line I had a little flash of inspiration and saw these ornate, somewhat bridal letter beads. I quickly whipped up a few samples and fell in love with them. The colors of gold, white and just a tinge of grey-blue, I spotted in a magazine for a holiday table setting a few days before. I would almost say this bead design arrived by happenstance. I didn't wake up that morning planning on monogram beads, but that photo was running around in my mind and somehow the two ideas meshed together.


So these are my beads inspired by a table setting photograph in a decorating magazine. My question today is where is the oddest place you've found inspiration? Leave a comment and next week one lucky winner will be picked to win the Illuminated Manuscript bead of their choice.

Friday, November 28, 2008

Intro to Gradients in Adobe Illustrator CS3

An eye-opening video that might be helpful for Adobe Illustrator beginners. It explores the use of linear and radial gradient in Adobe Illustrator CS3...

Random Tips: Dragging and dropping around the new panels can get kind of confusing. Make sure you always have your objects properly selected. When you create multiple color gradients save them as swatches, it is a big time saver.
Basic Gradients in Illustrator from Tom on Vimeo.

Original Winnie The Pooh Drawings

Winnie-the-Pooh

Winnie the Pooh [Lot]



winnie the pooh halfway through a wall

"Pooh pushed and pushed and pushed his way through the hole..."



winnie the pooh halfway through a wall drawing

"Oh, help!" said Pooh. "I'd better go back."
"Oh, bother!" said Pooh. "I shall have to go on."
"I can't do either!" said Pooh. "Oh, help and bother!" [Lot]




christopher robin drags pooh bear up stairs

He nodded and went out ...and in a moment I heard Winnie-the-Pooh
– bump, bump, bump – going up the stairs behind him." [Lot]

"This original illustration is reproduced on page 159 of Winnie-the-Pooh and comprises a full-page illustration in the published volume. It represents one of the iconic images of Winnie-the-Pooh and comes from the final chapter in which Christopher Robin gives a Pooh party, and we say good-bye.




Oh Pooh, Do You Think It's A - A - A Woozle.

..."What do you see there?"
"Tracks," said Piglet. "Paw-marks..."
Oh, Pooh! Do you thinks it's a – a – a Woozle?"

"This original illustration is reproduced on page 34 of Winnie-the-Pooh from the chapter in which Pooh and Piglet go hunting and nearly catch a woozle. This is the first drawing in the sequence of hunting illustrations." [Lot]



'What.' Said Piglet, With A Jump

"What?" said Piglet, with a jump.

"This original illustration is reproduced on page 37 of Winnie-the-Pooh. It is from the chapter in which Pooh and Piglet go hunting and nearly catch a woozle. It is the third drawing in the sequence of hunting illustrations." [Lot]



A Happy New Year

A Happy New Year [Lot]



Christmas Greetings

Christmas Greetings

"This illustration of Eeyore with holly, Pooh with a jar of honey and Piglet with a Christmas cracker comprises the original illustration for the only known Christmas card created by E.H. Shepard featuring the A.A. Milne characters." [Lot]



Do You See Piglet. Look At Their Tracks!

"Do You See Piglet? Look At Their Tracks!"

"This original illustration is reproduced (at a different angle to the original) on page 38 of Winnie-the-Pooh. It is from the chapter in which Pooh and Piglet go hunting and nearly catch a woozle. It is the fourth and final drawing in the sequence of hunting illustrations." [Lot]



winnie the pooh with head in a honey jar

"...there was a little left at the very bottom of the jar,
and he pushed his head right in..."

"This original illustration is reproduced on page 64 of Winnie-the-Pooh. It is from the chapter in which Piglet meets a Heffalump.
The reverse of the drawing includes a note that this drawing was given by Shepard's daughter as a gift in 1974." [Lot]



He Went on Tracking, and Piglet ... Ran After Him.

"With these few words he went on tracking, and Piglet,
after watching him for a minute or two, ran after him..."

"This original illustration is reproduced on page 35 of Winnie-the-Pooh and comprises a full-page illustration in the published volume. It is from the chapter in which Pooh and Piglet go hunting and nearly catch a woozle. It is the second drawing in the sequence of hunting illustrations." [Lot]



I Saw a Heffalump Today Piglet

"...Christopher Robin finished the mouthful he was eating
and said carelessly: "I saw a Heffalump to-day, Piglet."

"This original illustration is reproduced on page 55 of Winnie-the-Pooh. It is from the chapter in which Piglet meets a Heffalump." [Lot]



I'm Not Throwing It, I'm Dropping It, Eeyore.

"I'm not throwing it, I'm dropping it Eeyore."

{"Pooh had got the biggest stone he could carry, and was leaning over the bridge, holding it in his paws."}

"This original illustration was reproduced on page 98 of The House at Pooh Corner and is from the chapter in which Pooh invents the game of Poohsticks. At this point Eeyore had fallen into the river and Pooh, Piglet and Rabbit were attempting to make waves to wash him to the bank." [Lot]



Just The House For Owl. Don't You Think So, Little Piglet.

"Just the house for owl. Don't you think so, little Piglet?"

"This original illustration was reproduced on page 159 of The House at Pooh Corner and is from the chapter in which Eeyore finds the Wolery and Owl moves into it. It shows Eeyore suggesting to Piglet that Piglet's house, the "Wolery", would be a perfect new home for Owl."



pooh bear, piglet and rabbit

"Lucky we know the forest so well or we might get lost." [Lot]



Piglet Gets Ready For The Party

Piglet gets ready for the party.

"This Shepard drawing is a later version of that reproduced on page 149 of Winnie-the-Pooh from the final chapter of the book in which Christopher Robin gives a Pooh party." [Lot]



The Bath a

The Bath



The Bath b

The Bathmat

Christopher Robin gave a deep sigh... At the door he
turned and said, "Coming to see me have my bath?"

"These original illustrations are reproduced on pages 19 and viii respectively of Winnie-the-Pooh." [Lot]



The Friend

The Friend

"When offered at auction in May 1998 it was noted that a previous owner had typed the verse 'The Friend' (from Now We Are Six) and attached it to the back of the original frame (now destroyed). That poem notes that 'lots and lots of people... are always asking things' and Winnie-the-Pooh is a companion or confidant when confronted with these general knowledge questions. The published illustration shows Christopher Robin with Winnie-the-Pooh and, probably, a writing slate.

The idea of friendship through letter-writing is therefore not present in the poem and the illustration offered here may comprise an earlier illustration before Shepard had read Milne's verse." [Lot]



The Pooh Cook Book Preparatory Sketch a


The Pooh Cook Book Preparatory Sketch b

The Pooh Cook Book Preparatory Sketch(es)

"This preparatory sketch includes the reverse of the leaf prepared with pencil rubbing for transfer of outlines. The Pooh Cook Book, "inspired by" the A.A. Milne stories was written by Katie Stewart and published by Methuen in 1971. It was later renamed The Pooh Corner Cook Book." [Lot]



The Search for Small a

Very Small Beetle exercising round a gorse-bush



The Search for Small b

"Pooh!" he cried. "There's something climbing up your back."

"These original illustrations are reproduced on pages 52 and 47 respectively of The House at Pooh Corner. They both come from the chapter in which a search for Small is 'organdized'." [Lot]



Then They Went On To  Kanga's House, Holding On To Each Other.

"..then they went on to Kanga's house, holding on to each other.."

"This original illustration was reproduced on page 129 of The House at Pooh Corner and is from the chapter in which Piglet does a very grand thing. It shows Pooh and Piglet walking against the wind on the way to Kanga's house." [Lot]



When Christopher Robin Had Nailed It On Its Right Place

"...and when Christopher Robin had nailed it on in its
right place again, Eeyore frisked about the forest..."

"This original illustration is reproduced on page 52 of Winnie-the-Pooh. It is from the chapter in which Eeyore loses a tail and Pooh finds one." [Lot]



Wind on the Hill

Tailpiece illustration to AA Milne's 'Wind on the Hill'

"...But if I stopped holding
The string of my kite,
It would blow with the wind
For a day and a night..." [Lot]



Winnie-the-Pooh -- Two Preparatory Sketches

"As soon as he got home, he went to the larder; and he stood on a
chair, and took down a very large jar of honey from the top shelf."

"These preparatory sketches reveal Shepard's typical working practice with the reverse of the leaf prepared with pencil rubbing for transfer of outlines. The images show some heavy pencil markings where Shepard has heavily pressed down on his pencil for the process. The images are early since the spelling of Hunny has not yet been adopted within the illustration." [Lot]



Winnie-the-Pooh Lived In A Forest All By Himself Under The Name Of Sanders.

"...Winnie-the-Pooh lived in a forest all by himself under the name of Sanders.
"What does 'under the name' mean?" asked Christopher Robin.
"It means he had the name over the door in gold letters, and lived under it..."

"This original illustration is reproduced on page 3 of Winnie-the-Pooh and therefore accompanies the chapter in which Winnie-the-Pooh is first introduced." [Lot]



Preparatory Sketch-Map for Endpapers Of Winnie-the-Pooh

Preparatory sketch-map for endpapers of Winnie the Pooh.

"This is a preparatory drawing for the sketch-map reproduced on the endpapers of Winnie-the-Pooh and therefore one of the most celebrated locations in children's literature. Although the geography was not revised, several captions were evidently changed. 'Eeyores Gloomy Place' was originally 'Eeyores Pasture Land' and the 'Floody Place' was originally captioned 'Floods Might Happen Here'. Shepard also poses the question 'What sort of House is Kangas?' at the top of the map. The caption at the foot originally appeared as 'Drawn by Me helped by Mr Shepard' and shows a process of revision to 'Drawn by Me and Mr Shepard helped'. It was printed as 'Drawn by Me and Mr Shepard helpd'." [Lot]



pooh tigger and piglet at a table

(A version of-) 'Tiggers don't like Honey'
Oval pencil drawing of Winnie-the-Pooh, Tigger and Piglet sold on November 4, 2008 for £31200.


[click on any image - except the last - for a larger version]


All illustrations are by EH Shepard. {It is more probable than likely that they remain protected by copyright although I'm not sure I can determine just who (or which entity) owns those rights; nor am I sure what the extent of those rights might be. Suffice it to say that I accept that a variety of entities have a potential interest, and it is possible that this post may be removed if valid objections are raised. A wise man once told me that regions of universal harmony can be generated within the confluence of homage, fair use and free publicity, however. I'm banking on his having been sober at the time.}


These delightful illustrations are from the Sotheby's catalogue - click 'browse catalogue' - pertaining to the auction of forty two items, 'That sort of Bear': E.H. Shepard's Winnie-the-Pooh From the Collections of Stanley J Seeger and Christopher Cone, which will be held at New Bond Street in London on 17th December, 2008.

Ernest Howard Shepard (1879-1976) was born in London and encouraged to draw from a young age by his artist mother. He won a scholarship to the Royal Academy at the age of eighteen.

In the early years of the 20th century Shepard achieved some success with illustrated editions of Dickens and Aesop's fables. By 1907, Punch Magazine had accepted some of his drawings for publication although he wasn't a permanent Punch employee until 1921. He would remain there for more than thirty years.

In WWI, Shepard earned a Military Cross for bravery during service with the Royal Artillery in France and Belgium but he continued to sketch humorous vignettes which he submitted to Punch. In the 1920s, he was introduced to Alan (AA) Milne who reluctantly commissioned Shepard to do some line drawings for a children's book he had written. And the rest, as they say, is history.

Shepard and Milne were never particularly close but their collaboration on the four books - 'When We Were Very Young' (1924); 'Winnie the Pooh' (1926); 'Now We Are Six' (1927) and 'The House at Pooh Corner' (1928) - ensured that their names would be associated for eternity. Characters included Christopher Robin, Winnie the Pooh, Tigger, Eeyore, Piglet, Owl, Rabbit and Kanga.

The character of Winnie the Pooh was based on Milne's son's (Christopher) teddy bear, but the drawings were inspired by a toy bear named Growler, belonging to Shepard's own son. Growler would be mauled to death by a neighbour's dog, but Christopher's bear (and other stuffed Winnie the Pooh animals) circuitously made their way to the New York Public Library where I believe they still live. Late in life, Shepard was said to have voiced some resentment that the "silly old bear" had overshadowed his other illustration work, but he had expressed his fondness for the characters on many more occasions, so this phrase may have been more affectionate than has been reported*.

Although he pursued book and magazine illustration all through his life, Shepard's most notable work, beyond the AA Milne quartet, were the line drawings he produced for Kenneth Grahame's 'The Wind in the Willows', published in 1931.

I have taken the liberty of cleaning up all the images above (except for the map) which may have included removing some original ink splatters and charcoal or pencil smudging. Nothing too drastic, but they look better this way. I was surprised to find myself smiling often during the process. These simple line drawings retain an innocent magic about them and bring back fond childhood memories. There are a couple more drawings in the flickr set not seen above.

Christmas Tree Lord and Taylor Holiday Window

Christmas Tree Lord and Taylor Holiday WindowChristmas Tree Lord and Taylor Holiday Window, 5th avenue New York City. Lord and Taylor was the first store to decorate windows filled with Christmas and holiday displays rather than merchandise. Lord & Taylor
Image License: I, (sookietex) the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. This applies worldwide. In case this is not legally possible, I grant any entity the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

If This image is subject to copyright in your jurisdiction, i (sookietex) the copyright holder have irrevocably released all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way by anyone for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, with or without attribution of the author, as if in the public domain.

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Tiny Books in progress

I hope you had a lovely Thanksgiving day.
I'm still working on the tiny books.
They will be up for sale
at my shop
next Tuesday at noon CST.

‘Hints from the Model Garage’ by Rouse

TI list member Dan Picasso recently brought to my attention the work of an illustrator he greatly admired. I invited Dan to guest-write a post about this artist, and since the material is automotive in nature, I thought it would make a great conclusion to this week's topic:

If you were a fellow in the 1950s, as you paused before repairing a leaky faucet, retrieving a bolt you just dropped down your Studebaker’s intake manifold, or tearing into a new addition on your split-level, you might have fetched yourself a copy of Popular Science magazine to check your method and approach.


In the era between WWl and VietNam, Pop Sci bestrode the middleclass/middlebrow world of handy- and would-be-handymen like a Colossus- it sought to instruct and explain, in sometimes breezy, often earnest and occasionally dire fashion, the scientific and mechanical goings-on of a world in flux. Sawdust covered stacks of Pop Sci were typically found in basement workshops, their pages rife with photos and drawings of fellows with pipes clamped between their teeth building go-karts and kitchens and cyclotrons, or fabulously elaborate cutaways of manufacturing plants or warships.


A monthly feature of Pop Sci was ‘Hints from the Model Garage’, a two-page spread of automotive hints and tips. From perhaps ’49 to ’62, it was illustrated by a man who signed his work “Rouse”. No further credit accompanied his eight panels each month, nor am I even certain of his first name, but for the sake of this article let’s call him “Art”.


Rouse’s work goes far beyond the normal scope of technical illustration, which tends toward the dry and schematic: in addition to his precision he’s incredibly fluid, and shows signs of Horror Vacuii - there’s a graphomaniacal aspect to Rouse’s work which reminds me of Will Elder’s, sans the jokes.


Leif and I discussed the scratchboard look, but I’m convinced it’s done in ruling pen, crowquill and maybe a little tech pen, along with the aid of drafting equipment.


Bonafides in engineering or at least an intimate knowledge of how things work [and look] are explicit in Rouse’s rendering of ancillary parts and assemblies—it’s as if he can’t help himself; he must draw that windshield washer pump, and make it look great, even if the subject of the illustration is the carburetor.


Rouse’s manifestly dogged but lovely and complex approach—look at how not only the salient points of each illo but also the background details are fully fleshed out in sparkling detail—seem to suggest a man unafraid of sheer hard work in pursuit of his paycheck, and one who finds some delight in the dry corners of a niche of illustration which is normally carried out with little more than a purely factual approach.


None of this professional detachment for Rouse—he’s the Norman Rockwell of down-and-dirty tech illustration. From his rendering of faces, I get the hint that his instructive time took place in the ‘20s:


the guy under the car looks like F. Scott Fitzgerald to me, and overall the penwork has the enthusiasm and skillfully graceful modeling of Charles Dana Gibson, if far more rigidly applied.


I can’t help but think that Rouse, upon entering the studio for the day or evening, didn’t sigh and mutter, “Dear God, not another carburetor,” but instead brought to the board some kind of affection for the mundane mechanical subjects of his talents, and in doing so left behind some modestly astonishing examples of inspired hard work.


[I have been unable to find even a shred of information on Rouse the man, so any help readers can provide would be appreciated.]

Many thanks to Dan for his insightful remarks and for sharing these images from his collection!