Wednesday, March 31, 2010

New Trio

New Trio
Three little stamps I carved up today to decorate the envelopes I use for the shop.

Friendship love and truth

Friendship love and truthTitle: Friendship love and truth Creator: Currier & Ives. Date Created/Published: New York : Published by Currier & Ives, c1874. Medium: 1 print : lithograph, hand-colored. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC2-2373 (color film copy slide) Call Number: PGA - Currier & Ives--Friendship love and truth (A size) [P&P]
Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (4 mb) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

In 1857, Nathaniel Currier and James Ives became publishing partners in what was to become one of America's most historically significant chroniclers of American history from the 1850's to the 1880's. Currier & Ives recorded a wide range of subjects, events, and common happenings of American life. The firm employed many well known artists, but only a few of them are credited as the creator of their own images. The hand colored prints have become highly collectible and are found in many museums. The business closed in 1907 as new printing technologies and changing tastes emerged.

Medium : 1 print : lithograph, hand-colored. Created/Published : New York : Currier & Ives, 1874. Creator : Currier & Ives

Part of the Currier & Ives collection housed in the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case c1874) are now in the public domain..

When Friendship, Love and Truth abound Among a band of Brothers,

the cup of joy goes gaily round, each shares the bliss of others.

TEXT CREDIT: James Montgomery (1771-1854)

This text (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1813) are now in the public domain.

The Paperback: Books for "just plain folks"

From the March 1957 issue of American Artist magazine:

Henry Pitz writes: [Paperback publishers] have felt the nudge of competition from the books of newer design...


... and they are abandoning the old clichés and experimenting with fresh approaches.


It is only fair to point out that in addition to dozens of mystery and suspense stories,


adventure tales, westerns,


and popular novels which may not be literature but have a legitimate place in our scheme of reading, there are on their lists, in fiction, such names as Dostoevski, Tolstoi, Balzac, Zola, Thomas Wolfe, D.H. Lawrence, and Melville...


... and, among living writers, Rosamond Lehmann, Thornton Wilder, Ernest Hemingway, Aldous Huxley, Robert Penn Warren, Eudora Welty, Robert Graves, John Marquand, and James Michener.


Sol Immerman, vice-president of Pocket Books describes the company's marketing strategy...

"If we constantly realize that the great masses of the American public are, for the most part, just plain folks, we are immediately influenced in our thinking in regards to our approach."


"Each book (by means of its cover) must be its own salesman, advertisement, and direct contact with the buying public. Of course, the basic principles of good selling must govern our thinking. these are : 1. Attract attention; 2. Create interest; 3. Stimulate the desire to purchase."


"Each book is, and must be considered as, a packaging problem of its own. No two books are alike. No set formula can be laid down for all books. What works for one book cannot be expected to work for another."


"Trickiness will not do. It might attract attention, but surely will not fulfill our other two basic requirements.


Busyness - our readers do not have time to study and figure out what we are trying to say. We must reach them quickly, directly, and forcefully. All three sales principles can be lost here."


"Simplicity - if overdone - will not attract attention and so the ability to create interest and stimulate purchases will be lost."


"Bad Taste will offend our consumer. The experience gained in our seventeen years of publishing and selling paperbound books to the great masses of readers throughout the world has given us a fairly accurate picture of our markets, reading habits, tastes, likes and dislikes. This applies not only to what these readers like to look at, but also to the kind of books they like to read."


1. "What is our objective? To sell the most copies of each book we publish. 2. To whom do we wish to sell these books? To the greatest number of people in what we call America's mass market."


This ultimate goal for each book is sought after with the watchwords of the founders of our company - "To reach the greatest number of readers with the best books, for the least money."

* Accompanying this week's excerpts from the American Artist article are a broad sampling of mid-century paperback cover scans generously provided by one of my contacts on Flickr, UK Vintage. Many thanks Uilke!

Create on Demand

Some of us like the thrill of a little healthy competition to get the creative juices flowing.  Others just like the chance to win awesome prizes. And some need a deadline to get things done.  Here is a list of upcoming and soon due challenges to get that muse off her rear and at the worktable!

ABS March Monthly Challenge - today by midnight!

ABS Color Challenge Contest - April 1st - tomorrow

Bead Dreams - April 5th

Vintaj April Challenge - Spring Riverbed - April 9th


BeadStar - April 30th


If you know of any others, please leave a comment and I will add them to the list.  Happy Creating!

(Deadlines button from Allegrae)

Look for the ABS Carnival Button!

The Art Bead Scene has some wonderful bloggers participating in our monthly Carnival Blog. The next one is April 14th. Can't wait? Wondering who the ABS Carnival Bloggers are? Just look for the ABS Carnival button on their blogs to find them.



We're always happy to welcome another dedicated Art Bead Scene reader to our Carnival Blogger Group! Interested in joining? Please send an email to Cindy saying you'd like to join.

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Faith Hope Charity Currier & Ives

Faith Hope Charity Currier & IvesTitle: Faith Hope Charity. Creator: Currier & Ives. Date Created/Published: New York : Published by Currier & Ives, c1874. Medium: 1 print : lithograph. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC2-2296 (color film copy slide) Call Number: PGA - Currier & Ives--Faith Hope Charity (A size) [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.
Retrieve uncompressed archival TIFF version (4 mb) Digital ID: (color film copy slide) cph 3b50170, Reproduction Number: LC-USZC2-2296 (color film copy slide) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case c1874) are now in the public domain..

Give Back to Haiti




I have teamed up with Andrew Thornton, to collaborate on a piece of jewelry that we wanted to auction off for charity to help in the efforts to rebuild Haiti after the devastating earthquakes. 

Go over to my blog post, and leave your bids in the comments. The auction started yesterday and continues through til Midnight on Monday, April 5th.

A donation will be made to The American Red Cross/ Haiti Relief Fund.

Monday, March 29, 2010

Queen Victoria of England

Queen Victoria of EnglandQueen Victoria of England, by Alexander Melville, 1845, Friedenstein Castle Museum. Schloss Friedenstein in Gotha (Thüringen).

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death. Her reign lasted 63 years and 7 months, longer than any other British monarch, and her reign is the longest of any female monarch in history.
This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1845) are now in the public domain.

Gwen Frostic

Gwen Frostic
Have you ever heard of Gwen Frostic? I fell in love with her work after reading a feature article in the March 2005 Martha Stewart Living magazine.
Gwen Frostic's work @ MSL magazine
The last time we were in the US I was really excited to find a lovely bird-themed
block print Note Card set at Anthropologie. Aren't they enchanting?
I feel inspired to make a four color block print of my own...

Designer of the Week: Jill Palumbo

Each Monday we feature the Designer of the Week. One of our editors pick their favorite from the Monthly Challenge entries. This week's featured designer is Jill Palumbo.


ABS Editor, Cindy Gimbrone had this to say about Jill's submission:

What a lovely entry into the ABS March Challenge! It's such a beautiful interpretation of Van Gogh's painting. Jill has really captured the painting's spirit and created a true statement piece. I look to seeing more from her!

If you'd like to see more of Jill's work, you can visit her Etsy Shop.

Sunday, March 28, 2010

The Descent from the Cross Peter Paul Rubens

The Descent from the Cross Peter Paul RubensThe Descent from the Cross Peter Paul Rubens, Antwerp Cathedral; wood, H. 13 ft x 9 ft. 6 in. Nine figures.

The body of the Saviour is being lowered from the cross on a sheet by two men mounted on ladders; they are aided by Nicodemus on one side, and Joseph of Arimatheea on the other, also on the ladders; below, St John receiving the body in his arms; beside him are Mary Magdalen and Salome, kneeling, and extending their hands to assist him ; beyond, the Virgin, standing. It is evening, and the multitude has departed
The Jews therefore, because it was the Preparation, that the bodies should not remain on the cross upon the sabbath (for the day of that sabbath was a high day) asked of Pilate that their legs might be broken; and that they might be taken away. The soldiers therefore came, and brake the legs of the first, and of the other which was crucified with him: but when they came to Jesus, and saw that he was dead already, they brake not his legs: howbeit one of the soldiers with a spear pierced his side, and straightway there came out blood and water.

And he that hath seen hath borne witness, and his witness is true: and he knoweth that he saith true, that ye also may believe. For these things came to pass, that the scripture might be fulfilled, A bone of him shall not be broken. And again another scripture saith, They shall look on him whom they pierced.

And after these things Joseph of Arimatha:a being a disciple of Jesus, but secretly for fear of the Jews, asked of Pilate that he might take away the body of Jesus: and Pilate gave him leave. He came therefore, and took away his body. And there came also Nicodemus, he who at the first came to him by night, bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about a hundred pound weight. So they took the body of Jesus, and bound it in linen cloths with the spices, as the custom of the Jews is to bury. Now in the place.

where he was crucified, there was a garden; and in the garden a new tomb wherein was never man yet laid. There then because of the Jews' Preparation (for the tomb was nigh at hand) they laid Jesus.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1610-1611) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

TEXT CREDIT: Cyclopedia of painters and paintings, Volume 1 and The book of Easter

Sundays with Cindy



Good morning, Beady Readers! Wondering what's going on in the bead and jewelry world? Take a peek at our links and see.....

About.com Jewelry Making
Tammy has been showing off some of her favorite jewelry pieces on her blog this week like this pretty earring and necklace set.

Art Bead Scene
It's the Art Bead Scene Monthly Carnival Blog. This month's theme is "passion."

Beading Arts
Does the beginning of spring lift your spirits? Cyndi has made a spring bracelet sponsored by Artbeads to celebrate this most wonderful of all seasons.

Carmi's Art/Life World
A vintage TUMs container becomes a necklace centerpiece in Carmi's project this week.

Cindy Gimbrone aka Lampwork Diva
Rewind: Is your bronze metal clay warping? Then Cindy's got the tool for you - Rawhide!

Earthenwood Studio Chronicles
Whoo- whoo! New porcelain owl pendants inspired by internet sensation Molly the Owl

Saturday, March 27, 2010

The Elevation of the Cross Peter Paul Rubens

The Elevation of the Cross Peter Paul RubensIn 1610 when, according to tradition, Rubens had completed the St. Ildefonso altar-piece, he executed another work for the Walpurgis-church at Antwerp. This is the celebrated Elevation of the Cross, now in the transept of the cathedral at Antwerp. There is in the Louvre a drawing for this picture, giving an idea of the whole composition which, when finally executed, was divided into three parts. The Elevation of the Cross in the centre: on the right the Weeping Women: on the left the Roman Centurion. The central-subject has been reproduced in numberless ancient and modern prints).

A thick darkness covers the sky whilst the Saviour, extended upon the Cross, turns his suffering face towards the last rays of the setting sun.
The whole attention of the spectator is attracted by this figure alone for all the other figures are unimportant. Their whole attention appears to be directed to raising the heavy cross, and preventing it from slipping from its intended position. On one of the wings may be seen the Centurion, surrounded by other men on horseback, giving his orders with all the pride of a Roman official behind him are the two malefactors.

On the other wing is a striking group of the Mourning Women, amid whom St. John supports the Holy Mother overwhelmed with grief. Originally there was a lunette above the central-portion of this Ancona, representing God the Father, toward whom the Crucified One was directing his gaze: and also a predella consisting of three small pictures. These pieces were sold separately in the l8'h century by order of the church-authorities.

TEXT CREDIT: Title: Rubens Translated by: Luise Marie Schwaab Richter. Publisher: Velhagen & Klasing, 1904. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Mar 3, 2009 Length: 168 page

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1610-1611) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Sir Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Studio Saturday: Cindy wants to know what you think!

Welcome to Studio Saturday! Each week one of our contributors gives you a sneak peek into their studio, creative process or inspirations. We ask a related question of our readers and hope you'll leave comments! As an incentive we offer a free prize each week to bribe you to use that keyboard. The following week we choose a random winner.

Last week's winner is Mikki! Congratulations! You have won one of Heather's grab bags! Send Heather an email and she will get it right out to you.

Stepping in for Lynn Davis this week, is ABS Editor, Cindy Gimbrone.



Welcome to Studio Saturday! Over the past few years, I challenged myself to come up with interesting designs in beads and findings that could be made for production. I spent the last few years creating a line of beads that I could make a production level for wholesale orders. So I created modern, clean designs such as the Frost Links...



...and versatile findings like the double dips....

Although I love these and will keep making them, the wholesale hasn't taken off, so it's time to switch gears. I miss making painted beads like Thoughtful.



I know I want to freshen up my line of beads and make something in my style yet I'm not quite sure what. So, I'm asking your opinion. After reviewing the style of beads I make, what do you think is the next logical step in style? Do I pursue the modern, clean lines and create graphic style beads or pursue the painted beads or maybe something completely different from those choices?

I look forward to your suggestions! Leave a comment and you'll be entered to win the Red Art Modern bronze pendant.

Friday, March 26, 2010

The Last Supper Leonardo da Vinci

The Last Supper Leonardo da VinciThe Last Supper (1495-1498) Convent of Sta. Maria delle Grazie, Milan, Italy (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519). The Synoptic Gospels state that Christ's Last Supper was a Passover seder.
Passover begins on the 15th day of the month of Nisan (equivalent to March and April in Gregorian calendar), the first month of the Hebrew calendar's festival year according to the Hebrew Bible.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1495-1498) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris in this case Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

The Paper-Bounds Go Legit

"America has discovered the paperback book. Like so many of America's appetites it is a sudden and voracious thing. Will it disappear tomorrow? No one knows, but the publishers have been searching the shelves for nourishing things to feed it; almost every morsel they have offered has been relished and there are no present signs of repletion."


So begins Henry C. Pitz's article on "The Design of the Paperback Book" in the March 1957 issue of American Artist magazine. It provides an interesting counterpoint to the 1953 article from Fortune magazine we looked at all last week. Though not even five years had passed since Fortune examined the phenomenon of the "paper-bounds" one could safely say that a massive evolution in how America consumed popular culture was well under way. How this shift affected the illustration industry is evident in Pitz' article.


"The renaissance of the paperback in this country began less than twenty years ago," wrote Pitz. "It was a spectacular thing, a publishing area that grew to giant size over night. The artist was involved in it from the beginning and hundreds of paintings and drawings ranging from excellent to poor were commissioned."


"However, it must be admitted that the design world did not think of paperback cover design with admiration until a few years ago. A new impulse appeared when several of the publishers, notably Doubleday and Company, through their Anchor series, began to issue serious and scholarly works, which had been dormant in sales, in paperback form. The experiment was an instant success."



"The recent excitement may tend to make us forget that the real paperback renaissance began seventeen or eighteen years ago. For a while there was a mad scramble among eager opportunists... it is their product which has created the dominant image of the paperback in the American mind. They found outlets in places that never before had thought of handling books. We have seen them hundreds of times in drugstores, on newsstands and cigar counters, and even in many more unlikely places. It is not altogether our fault if we muster up an image of a salaciously realistic cover enclosing an innocuous content."


"It is by no means a fair image but the publishers must bear the blame for it, for many times they resorted to suggestive pictorial appeal in order to sell books of even superior content."





"This stage is passing rapidly."

* Accompanying this week's excerpts from the American Artist article are a broad sampling of mid-century paperback cover scans generously provided by one of my contacts on Flickr, UK Vintage. Many thanks Uilke!

* Thanks also to The Woman in the Woods for the final scan in today's post.

Mockingbird Stamp

Martha's Bird Stamp
Commissioned hand carved stamp for my friend Martha
based on one of her beautiful photographs.

Fit to Print Book Review: Totally Twisted

The subtitle of Kerry Bogert's new book is "Innovative Wirewire & Art Glass Jewelry." And that is exactly what you'll find in this colorful and fun book. 

I love that Kerry wrote in a conversational tone, you feel like you've stopped by her studio for the afternoon where she shares all her best tips and tricks for working with wire.

The book includes great step by step photos and clear instructions on the techniques.  The projects vary from using sterling silver wire to Kerry's signature mix of sterling and brightly colored artistic wire.  You'll learn how to make findings, your own chain, wire beads and how to use wire as a design element.

I love that the author shows 'tools' from common objects found in the studio like shaping a bracelet around a glass or links around tube of beads.  The idea that working with wire is easy and accessible is a common theme in the book.  I also enjoyed seeing the alternative views of the projects in different colors to show the versatility of the design and to spark the readers own variations.

Now let's talk art beads! Kerry is a glass beadmaker and every project in this book features a juicy collection of lampwork beads.  The projects could easily be adapted to showcase art beads of any medium.  I gave one of the projects a test run last weekend and worked up Kerry's Scrolliriffic bracelet using some of my disk beads, aquamarine stones and recycled glass, shown below.

I have wanted to make a chain using those s-links forever but just couldn't work them up successfully on my own.  After reading Kerry's directions I was whipping them out like a pro. 

You can find out more about Kerry on her blog and website, where sells her lampworked beads at http://www.kabconcepts.com/

Order a copy of Kerry's book today, I highly recommend it!
Totally Twisted: Innovative Wirework & Art Glass Jewelry

Reviewed by Art Bead Scene founder and editor, Heather Powers.

Thursday, March 25, 2010

The Three Bears and Golden Hair

The Three Bears and Golden HairTitle: The oak-tree fairy book: favorite fairy tales. Editor: Clifton Johnson. Publisher: Little, Brown, and Company, 1905. Original from: the University of California. Digitized: Oct 16, 2007. Length: 365 pages. Illustrated by George Willard Bonte Birth Date: 1873-05-16 Death Date: 1946-03-13.

Now the house that Golden Hair was in belonged to three bears — a big bear, a middle-sized bear, and a little bear. Shortly before Golden Hair rapped at their door they had cooked their porridge for dinner and set it on the table.
Then they had gone out for a little walk to give the porridge time to cool. While Golden Hair was asleep the bears came home. As soon as they entered the kitchen and looked at the table they saw that things were not as they had left them.

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN TASTING MY PORRIDGE!" growled the big bear in his great, gruff voice.

"and Somebody Has Been Tasting My Porridge!" said the middle-sized bear.

" And somebody has been tasting my porridge and eaten it all up!" piped the little bear.

"We will look around," said they, "and see if there has been any more meddling."

Then they went into the parlor.

"Somebody has been sitting in my chair!" growled the big bear in his great, gtuff voice.

"And somebody has been sitting in my chair!" said the middle sized bear.

"and somebody has been sitting in my chair and broken it all to pieces," piped the little bear.

Then they went upstairs to the chamber.

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN TUMBLING MY BED!" growled the big bear in his great, gruff voice.

"and Somebody Has Been Tumbling My Bed!" said the middle-sized bear.

"And somebody has been tumbling my bed, and here she is!" piped the little bear.

Golden Hair waked up just then, and before the three bears could catch her she slipped from the bed and scrambled down the stairs and out at the door. Then she ran home as fast as her legs could carry her, and she never went near the three bears' house again.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1905) are now in the public domain.

This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States, this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, Mainland China (not Hong Kong or Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law..

Paper-Bounds: Crunching the Numbers

* Today's excerpt deals mostly with the statistical information related to sales figures and number of volumes published during the early 1950s. For our purposes these figures reveal a couple of interesting considerations: that the paper-bounds required a tremendous amount of cover artwork annually (a spectacular new market for illustrators of varying skill levels) and that the artwork was being seen by many millions of American readers (remember that paper-bounds are often passed on or resold at used book stores, suggesting that two or three readers typically saw the one book purchased).



From Fortune magazine, September 1953:

The paper-bound houses this year are expecting to put out 1,200 titles compared to the combined major-book-club total of sixty-four.

"The machine," as it is called by one paper-bound publisher, was borrowed with only slight modifications from magazine publishing. First print orders for new paper-bound titles are usually for 250,000 copies, which can be printed at the rate or 12,000 books and 100,000 covers an hour, and trucked off along one of two distribution channels: the American News Co.; with its chain of 335 wholesale branches, or one of the 865 independent wholesalers. Jointly, the wholesalers supply some 100,000 retail outlets in the U.S. and Canada.


To keep their machinery rolling, paper-bound publishers consume new material at a burning pace. Some reprint houses are so hard up for new material that they have reprinted books that have already been through the mill. Others are reaching deep into trade backlists.


Material shortage shows most clearly in cutthroat competition for new manuscripts, in the form of advances to publisher and author against royalties. "The biggest guarantees," says one one paper-bound publisher, "are being paid for the books with the highest sex content."


Random House, for example, recently got $35,000 from Bantam for Lament for Four Virgins (Bantam admits the purchase was primarily for the title.)


The fencing for new material is polite sport compared to the struggle for outlets and display space. At the current production rate, an average of 25 million books and 100 titles are being poured into the market each month. Brentano's in Manhattan, with its big 1000-title display, still shows only a third of the currently available titles.



Mickey Spillane's sales last year are estimated to have equaled about a quarter the sales of all paper-bound nonfiction, including brisk sellers like Pocket Books' dictionary.


The first printing of Spillane's current title Kiss Me Deadly was three million copies. In Washington a drugstore manager thinks the Spillanes are "terrific - with women especially." In Dallas a wholesaler (who pronounces it "Spleen") says that Spillane is the greatest thing that ever happened to the newsstand business; "What we need is more Spleens."



* Accompanying this week's excerpts from the Fortune article are a broad sampling of mid-century paperback cover scans generously provided by one of my contacts on Flickr, UK Vintage. Many thanks Uilke!