Monday, May 31, 2010

A Girl with a Broom Carel Fabritius

A Girl with a Broom, oil on canvas: overall: 107.3 x 91.4 cm (42 1/4 x 36 in.) framed: 143.5 x 127.3 x 14 cm (56 1/2 x 50 1/8 x 5 1/2 in.)

Rembrandt Workshop in Amsterdam, Rembrandt van Rijn (related artist) Dutch, 1606 - 1669 Possibly Carel Fabritius (painter) Dutch, bapt. February 27, 1622, Middenbeemster - October 12, 1654, Delft probably begun 1646/1648 and completed 1651 Andrew W. Mellon Collection 1937.1.74.

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1923 are copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923, in this case 1651, are now in the public domain.
A Girl with a Broom, This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist, post mortem auctoris in this case Carel Fabritius October 12, 1654 and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31 of that year.

Featured Designer of The Week: KellsCreations

Each Monday the Art Bead Scene features the Designer of the Week. One of our editors picks her favorite from the Monthly Challenge entries. This week's featured designer is KellsCreations!

ABS editor Jennifer Heynen had this to say about Kelley's creation, "I like the many layers of this pendant, you can tell Kelley put a lot of thought into each one."

If you want to read more about this piece and what she was thinking about when creating it you you can find more on her KellsCreations blog.

Sunday, May 30, 2010

USS Iwo Jima Fleet Week New York Skyline 2010

USS Iwo Jima Fleet Week New York Skyline 2010Description: Sailors and Marines man the rails as the multi-purpose amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) arrives in New York to participate in Fleet Week New York. Image: 100526-N-9689S-005.jpg.

100526-N-9689S-005 NEW YORK (May 26, 2010) Sailors and Marines man the rails as the multi-purpose amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) arrives in New York to participate in Fleet Week New York. Approximately 3,000 Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen are participating in the 23rd Fleet Week New York, which will take place May 26 through June 2. Fleet Week has been New York City's celebration of the sea services since 1984. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Richard Stevens/Released)
This is a World Wide Web site for official information about the United States Navy. It is provided as a public service by the U.S. Navy's Office of Information, Washington, D.C.. The purpose of this Web site is to provide information about the United States Navy to the general public. All information on this site is considered public information and may be distributed or copied unless otherwise specified. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Howie Post (1927-2010)

Though he was not a member of the National Cartoonists Society, I felt it would be most appropriate to conclude this week's series with a look at Howard Post who, sadly, passed away recently. Tom Sawyer provided some wonderful excerpts from his memoirs for us to enjoy this past week. Howie Post was one of the gang of cartoonists with whom Tom had worked and laughed in the early days of his career.


Tom wrote, "I don't know if you're familiar with [Howie's] work, but he was part of our circle in NY, and later, for me, in LA, when he came out here to take a shot at TV comedy-writing. Interesting guy. In fact it was through Howie that I met the people who gave me my start in TV."

Back in 2005 my friend and fellow contributor to Drawn!, Jay Stephens, wrote this wonderful appreciation of Howie Post's accomplishments. I must admit, I had not realized until I read Jay's article that Post was responsible for creating (among others) the iconic Harvey Comics characters Spooky...


... and "The Good Li'l Devil" Hot Stuff (who was a childhood favourite of mine and was the inspiration for my avatar, which you see in the top right corner of this page).

During the late '60s Post also created a short lived (but still much beloved) DC comic called "Anthro."




And perhaps most famously, Howie Post created a nationally syndicated comic strip called "The Dropouts" which ran from 1968 to 1982.


There's an obituary at North Jersey.com that includes a great photo of the artist at his drawing table...


... and Craig Yoe has a very nice appreciation of Howie Post (and shares one of his early comic book stories) on his blog.

* Many thanks to Tom Sawyer for sharing memories of Howie Post with us.

* Thanks also to Heritage Auctions for allowing me to present scans from their archives to illustrate this post.

Sundays with Cindy



Happy Sunday! Hope you're enjoying your coffee this morning! Let's see what's going on in the Bead Blogging world....

A Bead A Day
Looking to make some super-sized jewelry just perfect for a princess? Lisa uses large blueberry briolettes and a swarovski mix to create just that!

About.com Jewelry Making
Tammy ask in this quick poll about how you use social networking to promote you and/or your jewelry business.

Art Bead Scene
ABS is here to help you with your business. Check out Zazzle to customize your earring cards for your jewelry business.

Barbe Saint John - New Jewelry from Forgotten Artifacts
Book Review: Wrap, Stitch, Fold and Rivet

Beading Arts
How many people out there are participating in the Bead Journal Project this year?

Carmi's Art/Life World
Carmi's button maker is the reason for this new vintage image necklace.

Cindy Gimbrone aka Lampwork Diva
This week's Wednesday Wire is a free tutorial, "Matchin' by Wrappin'."

Earthenwood Studio Chronicles
Learn about the Raku firing process and see the results of Melanie's new Raku adventures!

Humblebeads
Heather shares some time management tips for creatives.

Jean Campbell
Jean reviews Kate McKinnon's wonderful new addition, Sculptural Metal Clay.

Snap Out of It, Jean! There's Beading to be Done!
Jean is delighted to review Totally Twisted by Kerry Bogert! You will LOVE this book which focuses on wire and art beads!

Strands of Beads
Melissa discusses the process of reworking a weak necklace design - the revised version of which now appears on the cover of The Best of Step by Step Beads.

The Writing and Art of Andrew Thornton
Like Czech glass? Andrew hosts a giveaway courtesy of Raven's Journey. Find out how you can win these luminous beads!

Saturday, May 29, 2010

Blue

Blue
Inspired by the "Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions" by Anna Atkins
Watercolor & white acrylic ink on Twinrocker paper. 10" x 14"

Luminaries of the NCS: Warren King

The Reubens, the annual awards ceremony of the National Cartoonists Society (of which I am a proud member) was last night. I'm actually putting together this post in my hotel room on the morning after what was another terrific ceremony. As in previous years, I'm using this memorable occasion as an opportunity to showcase some of the Luminaries of the NCS. Today, Warren King.


My friend Tom Sawyer (whose career was the subject of a week of posts here on TI in 2008) has graciously agreed to share another excerpt from his memoirs.

Tom mentioned a group of cartoonist friends who all worked and laughed together in those days. He wrote, "Through Leonard, John [Augustin] and Tex, I began to meet and socialize with other artists, some who’d drop by the studio, several of whom would become close friends, meaningful players in my life for years to come, Stan Drake, Warren King, John Prentice and Howard Post, to name a few." That quote has been the basis for this NCS series.

I asked Tom to elaborate on Warren King, whom he only mentioned in passing in that memoir excerpt, but of whom he clearly had a lot of fond memories.


Tom wrote back, "About Warren King, he had for years been Rube Goldberg's assistant (during Rube's long career as an editorial cartoonist). And when Rube retired (and took up sculpture in his late 70's or early 80's, Warren became the editorial cartoonist for the NY Daily News."


"Rube, BTW was a lovely, witty man, whose most memorable quote in my presence was: "Tits never hurt anybody." And speaking of quotes, one of Warren's that I particularly remember was his description of dogs. He referred to them as "hairy shit-machines."



Tom concluded, "Warren was a very entertaining guy with a singular, distinctive laugh - so particular that even in a roomful of people laughing, his stood out. And we did a lot of laughing in those days."


* Many thanks to Tom Sawyer for sharing this wonderful excerpt from his memoirs with us. The text today is Copyright © 2010 by Tom Sawyer Productions, Inc.

* Thanks to Flickr member, Tribe for sharing his scan of a 1949 comic book page by Warren King that appears in today's post.

* Thanks also to Lee Dunbar for sharing his photo of an original Warren King political cartoon.

Studio Saturday with Jennifer Jangles


Welcome to Studio Saturday! Each week one of our contributors gives you a sneak peek into their studio, creative process or inspirations. We ask a related question of our readers and hope you'll leave comments! As an incentive we offer a free prize each week to bribe you to use that keyboard. The following week we choose a random winner.

Last weeks winner is Erin(comment 5). Congratulations you've won one a set of the transparent Turquoise Links and Double Dips from Cindy . Send Cindy an e-mail and she will get it right out to you.


This week we are in the studio with Jennifer Heynen of Jennifer Jangles.




Hi there,
This week is a busy, busy week for me. I am packing up and heading out to Bead and Button! I will be teaching five classes and selling my beads and buttons at the show. There's lots going on in the studio. I have been showing lots of shots from the studio over at my own blog, so I thought it would be fun to show you some of my new pendants here at the Art Bead Scene Blog. I always want to have new work for the show so that way when my customers come to my booth and ask "what's new?" I have something to show them. This year I will have lots!

I am in love with Ready Stamps, that's where I get my custom made stamps made. They are a great company that always does high quality work. I drew up these new pendants this spring, got the stamps made, and have been playing with glazes. These are a few of my favorites. The starfish above has several different oranges on the pendant for depth and texture.


Still to this day, I am in love with my "wow" color combination. I can't stop glazing beads and pendants in lime green, turquoise, black, and white. I am always happy with how they turn out.


Last of the pendants I will be showing you today is my little birdhouse. My woodland birds needed a home and now they have one.

This week will be a super easy question, and if you answer it you will be added into the drawing to win one of my new birdhouse pendants. Will you be going to Bead and Button this year? If you are coming, please stop by and say hello, I am in booth 1103.

Friday, May 28, 2010

Memorial Day Remember

Memorial Day RememberMemorial Day Mini Poster #1. was created by Patrick Harris of the Air Force News Agency.

AF.mil is provided as a public service by the Office of the Secretary of Air Force (Public Affairs).

Information presented on AF.mil is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Luminaries of the NCS: Leonard Starr

The Reubens, the annual awards ceremony of the National Cartoonists Society (of which I am a proud member) is now under way. I'm actually putting together this post in my hotel room at the event! As in previous years, I'm using this week as an opportunity to showcase some of the Luminaries of the NCS. Today, Leonard Starr.


My friend Tom Sawyer (whose career was the subject of a week of posts here on TI in 2008) has graciously agreed to share another excerpt from his memoirs. Tom picks up the story where we left off yesterday; in those first few days of drawing backgrounds in the studio of the artist Tex Blaisdell had nicknamed ‘Glamorous-and-Unpredictable.’

Excerpted from Thomas B. Sawyer's memoirs:

"Leonard Starr appeared several days later, in town from his home in Centerport, on Long Island’s North Shore. His presence didn’t disappoint. Handsome, tall, blonde, self-assured, witty and, true to Tex’s billing, striking in a star-quality way.


We hit it off immediately, beginning what would become the single closest friendship I would ever have – the kind where, even after weeks or months without contact, our wide-ranging conversations would resume as if there had been no interruption, endlessly stimulating as always. Books, art, movies, theater – and especially, once he’d educated me about it, music."


"And among the best of all, for me, was the fact that he liked my work, quickly ‘promoting’ me from merely doing backgrounds to handling ‘breakdowns’ as well. Another new piece of terminology, this consisted of taking the scripts he was given, and laying out the pages, deciding on panel-size and shape, rough-penciling the figures, arranging and loosely lettering dialogue balloons so that the lettering-man had sufficient space. Storytelling, actually, and in a cinematic way."


"Through Leonard, John [Augustin] and Tex, I began to meet and socialize with other artists, some who’d drop by the studio, several of whom would become close friends, meaningful players in my life for years to come, Stan Drake, Warren King, John Prentice and Howard Post, to name a few."


Leonard Starr has come up in the course of discussion in other posts on Today's Inspiration. On one occasion, while discussing illustrator Frank Reilly's art school, David Apatoff provided these recollections from Starr, who had attended the Reilly school:

"Reilly was the best teacher I ever saw-- the only one who was really worthy of the title, "teacher." My teachers at Pratt were all tired re-treads, who were interested in 2 dimensional design but couldn't teach you how to draw. They would walk around the room and remind you that the human hand has 5 fingers. I learned far more from the Famous Artists School training materials."


"Then one day when I was 27 I was talking with Dean Cornwell at the bar at the Society of Illustrators. I was already doing well as a professional artist but I still felt I had real gaps in my learning. Dean told me that he was "impressed with the work that Frank Reilly's kids are doing." So I went to Reilly and he took me on as a student."


"Reilly taught that drawing was a matter of "relationships"-- from the neck to the hip bone, from the tip of the shoulder to the groin, he showed us how everything combined to make the figure come alive. Kids always start out making the figure lean to one side or the other, but Reilly showed us how to nail that figure down: "at least one of those legs must be supporting the weight of that body." He was just remarkable. I never left a class without learning something new. I wish he had been my teacher starting in high school, then I would really have been able to draw. He was better than George Bridgman (who Reilly dismissed as "an anatomist.") Unlike Bridgman, Reilly taught you in a way that made the anatomy naturally go where it was supposed to go."


... and for a post on NCS member John Prentice, David provided the following quotes from Leonard Starr, which shed light on how his "On Stage" strip came into being:

"Johnny and I shared an apartment in Manhattan-- it was a dreadful little place-- but we were living "la vie Boheme," making a living as artists (although not a very good one. Whoever received the last check paid for the groceries). We worked for Johnstone and Cushing and other places, but I was shopping around some comic strips to syndicates (including On Stage). Then one day, we got word that Alex Raymond had been killed in a car crash. I received a call from Sylvan Byck, the cartoon editor for King Features. He told me that Raymond had only worked two days ahead, and the syndicate was in a panic."


"Could I come right over and take up Rip Kirby where Raymond had left off? I thought about it... Rip Kirby was a sure thing, and it was very tempting, but I decided to take a chance and try my luck with my own strip a while longer."


"So I told Sylvan, "You don't want me, but the very best guy in the world for the job is sitting right next to me." Sylvan responded, "send him right over!" And that's how Sylvan met Johnny and Johnny got the Rip Kirby strip."


"It turned out, that same day, the head of the Chicago Tribune Syndicate was on a train reading a newspaper, saw that Raymond had died, and got off the train at the next stop to send me a telegram confirming that I would be doing On Stage for his syndicate. He figured that King Features would be looking for a replacement for Raymond. So Johnny and I each got our strips at the same time, and took off from there."



* Many thanks to Tom Sawyer for sharing this wonderful excerpt from his memoirs with us.

His portion of the text in today's post is Copyright © 2010 by Tom Sawyer Productions, Inc.

* Thanks to David Apatoff for sharing the quotes from Leonard Starr that appear in today's post.

* I'd also like to thank Alan Light, for allowing me to use his photo of Leonard Starr at the conclusion of today's post.

* Thanks also to Heritage Auctions for allowing me to use all the artwork scans from their archives to illustrate this post.

Stone Collection

Stone collection
If you click on the photo it will take you to my Flickr stream
where I've put tags on each of the stones so you can see where they're from.
The crochet covered stoned are mostly made by my friend
Margie Oomen from Resurrection Fern.
The little porcelain pebbles are from Manos by Karin Eriksson.
The big white porcelain stone was handmade by Paula Valentim from Otchipotchi.

Bead Soup Favorites


I'm so excited to be joining the party this time around! I thought I'd share some of my favorite picks from the Bead Soup Party Flickr Group I'm looking forward to seeing what everyone creates, we have such an awesome community of jewelry designers in the blog-o-sphere.

Mardi Gras Designs

Mistick Krewe of Comus 1873 'Missing Links' Parade Costume Designs
&
Mistick Krewe of Comus 1910 Float Designs

New Orleans, Louisiana




Sea Nettle and Bat by Charles Briton 1873
Sea Nettle and Bat



Sea Dragon and Coral Polyp by Charles Briton 1873
Sea Dragon and Coral Polyp



Fly and Spider by Charles Briton 1873
Fly and Spider



Snail and Leech drawings by Charles Briton 1873
Snail and Leech



Alligator and Zebra by Charles Briton 1873
Alligator and Zebra



Salamander and Lobster by Charles Briton 1873
Salamander and Lobster



Wild Boar and African Elephant by Charles Briton 1873
African Elephant and Wild Boar


  • Comus is the Greek god of revelry, merrymaking and festivity. He was the son and cup-bearer of the god Dionysus.
  • Krew is an organisation that puts on a parade or ball for the Carnival season (New Orleans Mardi Gras and some other carnival sites in the US).
  • Mistick Krewe of Comus is a New Orleans Carnival krewe founded in 1856 - prior to this, Carnival celebrations in New Orleans were mostly confined to the Roman Catholic Creole community, and parades were organised informally.

Tulane University Libraries has (so far) contributed two digital collections from their Carnival research works to the Louisiana Digital Library. [via]

Above, sample drawings from the Mistick Krewe of Comus 1873 'Missing Links' Parade Costume Designs {browse} [the collection contains 101 sketches]
"This collection is the complete set of costume design drawings for the 1873 Mystick Krewe of Comus "Missing Links" parade. It was an important event in New Orleans' Mardi Gras history, becoming one of the first major parades to use satire and political commentary.

That year, there were no floats, but the members paraded in costumes made of papier-mache, based on the drawings in this collection. A Swedish lithographer, Charles Briton, made the designs. [..] The official name of the parade was "The Missing Links to Darwin's Origin of Species". [..]

Many of the images depict figures related to the Civil War and Reconstruction, such as Ulysses S. Grant, Benjamin Butler, and Louisiana Governor Henry Warmoth. Also depicted are notable figures such as Charles Darwin, and Algernon Badger (head of the Metropolitan Police)."


The images below are from the Mistick Krewe of Comus 1910 float designs {browse}
"This collection is the complete set of float design drawings by Jennie Wilde for the 1910 Comus Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans, Louisiana. [..]

Jennie Wilde (1865-1913) was an artist who designed floats for many New Orleans Mardi Gras parades, including the Mistick Krewe of Comus and the Knights of Momus. The theme of the 1910 Comus parade was the Prophet Mahomet (Muhummad) and related subjects."

UPDATE: Recommended by a commenter: 'Mardi Gras New Orleans' by Henri Schindler, 1997.



Comus 1910
Comus



The Cock 1910
The Cock



The Koran 1910
The Koran



Cadijah 1910
Cadijah



Habib the Wise 1910
Habib the Wise



Reward of the Faithful 1910
Reward of the Faithful



The Mystic Shrine 1910
The Mystic Shrine