Tuesday, May 31, 2011

First Day of Summer Summer solstice

The summer solstice occurs exactly when the Earth's axial tilt is most inclined towards the sun. Though the summer solstice is an instant in time, the term is used colloquially to refer to the day on which it occurs.

The summer solstice occurs some time between June 20 and June 21 in the Northern Hemisphere. Worldwide, interpretation of the event has varied from culture to culture, most have held a recognition involving holidays, festivals, gatherings, rituals or other celebrations around that time.

The word solstice derives from Latin sol (sun) and sistere (to stand still).

Privacy & Security Notice The DoD Imagery Server is provided as a public service by the American Forces Information Service.

The Defense Visual Information Directorate. Information presented on DoD Imagery Server is considered public information. except where noted for government and military users logged into restricted areas) and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline, photo, image credits is requested.

First Day of Summer Summer solsticeAbout Images on DefenseLINK, All of these files are in the public domain unless otherwise indicated.However, we request you credit the photographer, videographer as indicated or simply "Department of Defense."

This image or file is a work of an employee of the Department of Defense, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image or file is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

TEXT RESOURCE: Summer solstice From Wikipedia

Monday, May 30, 2011

Desktop Calendar for June

June desktop calendar
Hello friends :)
I'll be taking a month long computer break during June to work on a few deadlines.
My Etsy shop will be closed during June as well.
If something comes up I'll be posting at my Facebook page.
Add me to your "Likes" if you like :)
I'll leave you with a free desktop calendar for the month of June.
Click on this link or on the image above to download the calendar.
I'll see you back here in July!

Memorial Day Honor the brave May 30, 1917

Title: Honor the brave, Memorial Day, May 30, 1917. Date Created / Published: 1917. Medium: 1 print (poster) : lithograph, color ; 65 x 101 cm. Summary: Poster showing boys with fife and drum leading a parade of veterans and soldiers. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-6266 (color film copy transparency)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on reproduction.

This IMAGE (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1917) are now in the public domain.

Call Number: POS - WWI - US, no. 410 (C size) [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

Notes:

In memory of American soldiers of the wars of 1775-1783, 1812-1814, 1846-1847, 1861-1865, 1898. Monogram unidentified. Forms part of: Willard and Dorothy Straight Collection.

Memorial Day Honor the brave May 30, 1917Subjects:

Memorial Day--1910-1920. World War, 1914-1918--Recruiting & enlistment--United States.
Parades & processions--1910-1920. Veterans--1910-1920. Soldiers--1910-1920.

Format:

Lithographs--Color--1910-1920. War posters--American--1910-1920.

Collections:

Posters: World War I Posters

About the World War I Posters

During World War I, the impact of the poster as a means of communication was greater than at any other time during history. The ability of posters to inspire, inform, and persuade combined with vibrant design trends in many of the participating countries to produce thousands of interesting visual works. The Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division makes available online approximately 1,900 posters created between 1914 and 1920. Most relate directly to the war.

Sunday, May 29, 2011

Tomb of the Unknowns Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Memorial Day

The Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., is also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and has never been officially named. The Tomb of the Unknowns stands atop a hill overlooking Washington, D.C. On March 4, 1921, Congress approved the burial of an unidentified American soldier from World War I in the plaza of the new Memorial Amphitheater.

The white marble sarcophagus has a flat-faced form and is relieved at the corners and along the sides by neo-classic pilasters, or columns, set into the surface. Sculpted into the east panel which faces Washington, D.C., are three Greek figures representing Peace, Victory, and Valor.

The Tomb sarcophagus was placed above the grave of the Unknown Soldier of World War I. West of the World War I Unknown are the crypts of unknowns from World War II, Korea and Vietnam. Those three graves are marked with white marble slabs flush with the plaza.

The six wreaths (three carved on both the north and south sides on the Tomb are inverted to represent mourning. The six wreaths represent the six major battle campaigns of World War I: Chateau-Terrie; Ardennes; Oisiu-Eisue; Meusse-Argonne; Belleauwood; and Sommes.

Inscription (author unknown) on the back (west side) of the tomb:

HERE RESTS IN HONORED GLORY AN AMERICAN SOLDIER KNOWN BUT TO GOD

CEMETERY HOURS: 7 Days a Week, 365 Days - 8AM - 7PM (April - September). 8AM - 5PM (October - March)

Tomb of the Unknowns Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Memorial DayThe Arlington National Cemetery homepage is a public service of Arlington National Cemetery.

Information presented on this homepage is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline / photo / image credits is requested.

This file is a work of an employee of the Arlington National Cemetery, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Falconry

Falconry is the art of using a trained raptor (bird of prey) to hunt wild quarry like birds or small mammals. The practice dates to at least 2000 BC and birds used for falconry (or hawking, a near-synonymous term in the modern parlance) include buzzards, eagles, Harris hawk, Peregrine falcons, Lanner falcon, Gyrfalcon, goshawks, owls and kestrels, among others.

The pastime is complicated and time-consuming and, in America at least, requires a minimum two year apprenticeship. The raptors are not pets and do not establish a bond with their handlers beyond trust and food source. Objections to falconry have been raised by environmentalists (it is virtually outlawed in Australia, albeit indirectly, for example) but the falconry community has made significant and undeniable contributions to species conservation and protection. I don't know enough to have an opinion other than to suppose that the trainer/handler licensing should be stringent (not too different from my thoughts on parenting).
The lithographs below, produced in the mid-1800s, come from 'Traité de Fauconnerie' by H Schlegel and AH Verster de Wulverhorst [source].



chromolithograph of Hooded falcon perched on handler's gloved hand, by H Schlegel, 1853
Le Groënlandais, Faucon Blanc Mué


(Hooded White Greenlander falcon or gyrfalcon - based on a portrait of the bird by Pierre Louis Dubourcq)



Close-up of hooded bird's head
Hooded falcon close-up



frontispiece / title-page of 'Traité de Fauconnerie' by H Schlegel, 1853
Titlepage of 'Traité de Fauconnerie', 1844-1853


Each of the above images was spliced together from screen captures;
click through to large and very large versions.




book illustration of training equipment used in falconry
Tethering and training equipment used in falconry




raptor hoods - 1853 lithograph
Raptor* hoods

"Falconry hoods are among the very first pieces of equipment that a falconer will obtain when beginning to learn the art of falconry. A properly fitted hood ensures that the bird remains calm while in the presence of humans, as otherwise it may become alarmed and distraught. A hood is essential in making a bird ready for training. The acclimatization of the bird to humans is known as "manning" and is the first step in the training regimen." [source]




L'Émérillon Hagard, le Tiercelet sors et Hagard d'Émérillon




hawk illustration
Le Tiercelet sors de l'Autour




raptor lithograph
Le tiercelet Hagard de Faucon d'Islande




picture of two birds used in falconry
L'Épervier sors et le Mouchet Hagard





Le Faucon Hagard

[A bird of prey "taken from a nest in the wild or bred in captivity is known as an eyas. A hawk trapped during its first year in the wild is called a passager, and a hawk trapped in its adult plumage is termed a haggard. The female peregrine falcon is properly called a falcon, and the male — which, in common with most species of raptors, is smaller than the female — is known as a tiercel." {source}]



falcon on rock staring up intently
Le Sacre Hagard



lithograph of crouched raptor
Le Gerfaut Sors



'Traité de Fauconnerie' (1844-1853) by Hermann Schlegel and Abraham H Verster van Wulverhorst is available online at Heinrich Heine Universität Düsseldorf [click 'Übersicht' for thumbnail pages] [Amazon]
"The finest work on Falconry which has ever been produced; not only on account of the beauty of the plates, wherein the hawks are depicted life-size and of the natural colours, but also for the general accuracy of the letterpress. [..]

Exclusive of the ornamented title-page, there are 16 folio plates, 2 of which are illustrative of Heron Hawking at the Loo, in 1844, with portraits of contemporary falconers; 2 others contain figures of hoods, jesses, lure, and other accessories; and the remaining 12 give life-sized coloured figures of the hawks employed by falconers, admirably drawn by Joseph Wolf and J. B. Sonderland."
As quoted from the veritable bible of falconry literature: 'Bibliotheca Accipitraria : A Catalogue of Books Ancient and Modern Relating to Falconry' By James Harting, 1891 (Revised) Online | Amazon | Bibliothecca Accipitraria II.

'Traité de Fauconnerie' was published in an elephant folio format (about 20x25 inches - hence, the descriptions talk of "life size" illustrations). It was issued in three instalments over nine years.

Less than one hundred copies were originally issued in the first edition between 1844 and 1853, of which only about fifty copies are known to have survived. I've seen prices in recent years ranging from £12,000 to £28,000 to £36,500 and the Abu Dhabi National Library was quoted more than £95,000 for a first edition copy last year to outfit their falconry collection.

Saturday, May 28, 2011

Memorial Day Arlington National Cemetery 2011

Almost four million people a year visit the national cemetery across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., where a constant vigil is maintained at the Tomb of the Unknowns. Arlington National Cemetery is the site of the changing of a military guard around the clock daily. On Veterans Day 1921, a coffin bearing the body of an unidentified soldier of World War I was entombed adjacent to the Memorial Amphitheater and a monument weighing more than 100 tons placed atop it in 1932. Nearby crypts bear the remains of unknown American service members of World War II and the Korean War. The remains of a previously unknown Vietnam service member were exhumed on May 14, 1998, identified as Air Force 1st Lt. Michael Joseph Blassie, and removed for burial.

Each Memorial Day and Veterans Day, a presidential wreath is placed at the tomb. This may explain why Arlington is America’s most well-known national cemetery, even though it is not the largest or the oldest. Some 230,000 veterans and dependents are buried on the cemetery’s 612 acres. From Pierre L’Enfant, George Washington’s aide during the American Revolution, to American service members killed during Operation Desert Storm, Arlington holds the remains of veterans representing every military action the United States has fought.

Memorial Day Arlington National Cemetery 2011The Arlington National Cemetery homepage is a public service of Arlington National Cemetery.

Information presented on this homepage is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline / photo / image credits is requested.

This file is a work of an employee of the Arlington National Cemetery, taken or made during the course of the person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office.

Friday, May 27, 2011

The Virginian: a horseman of the plains

The Virginian: a horseman of the plains The Virginian is published. May 28, 1902:. By Owen Wister, Illustrations by Arthur Ignatius Keller (1866 - 1924).

It was now the Virginian's turn to bet, or leave the game, and he did not speak at once.

Therefore Trampas spoke. "Your bet, you sonof-a ."

The Virginian's pistol came out, and his hand lay on the table, holding it unaimed. And with a voice as gentle as ever, the voice that sounded almost like a caress, but drawling a very little more than usual, so that there was almost a space between each word, he issued his orders to the man Trampas: —

"When you call me that, smile." And he looked at Trampas across the table.

Yes, the voice was gentle. But in my ears it seemed as if somewhere the bell of death was ringing; and silence, like a stroke, fell on the large room. All men present, as if by some magnetic current, had become aware of this crisis. In my ignorance, and the total stoppage of my thoughts, I stood stock-still, and noticed various people crouching, or shifting their positions.

The Virginian: a horseman of the plainsTitle: The Virginian: a horseman of the plains. Author: Owen Wister. Publisher: Macmillan, 1902. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: May 16, 2008. Length: 504 pages. Subjects: Fiction › Westerns, Cattle stealing, Cowboys, Fiction / Westerns, Vigilantes.

This IMAGE (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this case 1902) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case Arthur Ignatius Keller (1866 - 1924), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31st of that year.

"Sit quiet," said the dealer, scornfully to the man near me. "Can't you see he don't want to push trouble? He has handed Trampas the choice to back down or draw his steel."

Then, with equal suddenness and ease, the room came out of its strangeness. Voices and cards, the click of chips, the puff of tobacco, glasses lifted to drink, — this level of smooth relaxation hinted no more plainly of what lay beneath than does the surface tell the depth of the sea.

For Trampas had made his choice. And that choice was not to "draw his steel." If it was knowledge that he sought, he had found it, and no mistake! We heard no further reference to what he had been pleased to style "amatures." In no company would the black-headed man who had visited Arizona be rated a novice at the cool art of self-preservation.

One doubt remained: what kind of a man was Trampas? A public back-down is an unfinished thing, — for some natures at least. I looked at his face, and thought it sullen, but tricky rather than courageous.

Something had been added to my knowledge also. Once again I had heard applied to the Virginian that epithet which Steve so freely used. The same words, identical to the letter. But this time they had produced a pistol. "When you call me that, smile!" So I perceived a new example of the old truth, that the letter means nothing until the spirit gives it life.

TEXT CREDIT: The Virginian: a horseman of the plains

Turbo by Daniel

Turbo by Daniel
A beautiful photo of the 'turbinator' that Daniel took with my camera.
Thank you so much for all the kindness and generosity you've shown Daniel.
He was so happy everyone liked his portrait of Carmel kitty.
Have a great weekend friends!

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Carmel

Carmel portrait
Another masterpiece pet portrait by my very talented son Daniel.
He'll be offering his custom pet portraits at my bigcartel shop starting next Monday.

July 4th fireworks, Washington, D.C.

Title: July 4th fireworks, Washington, D.C. Creator(s): Highsmith, Carol M., 1946-, photographer. Date Created/Published: 2007 July 4. Medium: 1 photograph : digital, TIFF file, color. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-highsm-04460 (original digital file)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LC-DIG-highsm- 04460 (ONLINE) [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print.

Notes:
Title, date, and subjects provided by the photographer.
Credit line: Carol M. Highsmith's America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.
Gift and purchase; Carol M. Highsmith; 2009; (DLC/PP-2010:031).
Forms part of: Carol M. Highsmith's America Project in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive.
Photographer's choice (America project).

Subjects:
United States--District of Columbia--Washington (D.C.)
July 4th fireworks.
America.

Format:
Digital photographs--Color--2000-2010.

Collections:
Highsmith (Carol M.) Archive

July 4th fireworks, Washington, D.C.The online presentation of the Carol M. Highsmith Archive features photographs of landmark buildings and architectural renovation projects in Washington, D.C., and throughout the United States. The first 23 groups of photographs contain more than 2,500 images and date from 1980 to 2005, with many views in color as well as black-and-white. Extensive coverage of the Library of Congress Jefferson Building was added in 2007. The archive is expected to grow to more than 100,000 photographs covering all of the United States.

Highsmith, a distinguished and richly-published American photographer, has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world. Her generosity in dedicating the rights to the American people for copyright free access also makes this Archive a very special visual resource.

James R. Bingham: War & Peace

Some people are born to illustrate and it would appear James R. Bingham was such a person. An entry on Bingham in the book, Illustrating for the Saturday Evening Post certainly suggests as much. "In a way," writes author Ashley Halsey Jr., "James R. Bingham was spared a lot of worrying over what he would be when he grew up. At the extremely early age of three, he decided to be an artist."

Bingham55

Bingham was born in Pittsburgh in 1917 and according to his son, Jim Jr., "Dad attended Carnegie Art in Pittsburgh, Pa for one or two semesters, then was offered a teaching position. At that point he decided if he was good enough to teach he was probably good enough to work, so he went to NY and found an advertising agency to represent him. And the rest is history - he never looked back."

Bingham55.detail01

It must have been at Carnegie Art where Bingham met the girl he would marry. Ashley Halsey Jr. wrote, "In his sophomore year in college, he began dating a nice girl who lived across the street."

Bingham54.detail01

"They are now married, and have a son and a daughter."

Bingham54

Bingham's art career wasn't really interrupted by WWII. He simply switched from working for himself to working for Uncle Sam.

Bingham57

Bingham22.jpg

Bingham's son told me, "Dad was attached to the army to illustrate manuals for operation & maintenance of secret bomb sites and other things under development as pictures weren't available."

Bingham58

"The bulk of this work never saw the light of day as the units became obsolete faster than the art work could be utilized."

Bingham59

"Some of it was in animation style to show usage of the unit."

After his stint with the Army Airforce, Bingham became a Navy officer attached to the Office of Research and Invention.

Bingham60

After the war, Bingham returned to New York and commercial art, where he was represented by Thompson Associates. "My Dad was the first artist Seymour [Thompson] represented and did so for many years," Jim Jr. told me. Below, a Thompson ad from the 1946 NY Art Directors Annual.

Bingham52

In that same annual Bingham received an Art Directors Club Medal for magazine editorial art.

Bingham51

One of his advertising pieces also made it in that year's show.

Bingham50

In Illustrating for the Saturday Evening Post, Halsey Jr. wrote, "Bingham commutes daily to his studio in New York City - and then brings work home with him nearly every night. In one nine-year stretch, he took exactly eleven days of vacation."

Bingham56

And Jim Jr. confirms his dad's superhuman work ethic, although he hints at its unfortunate consequences:

"Dad didn't garner a lot of attention as he always worked at home or in a private studio. He, as with a lot of artists, was a loner in regards to most of the trappings of life. Art was his life and the rest of it was sometimes a strain. I believe great artists make lousy parents and more times than not, poor soul mates. Dad was giving of his money and other assets but very stingy with his time. Although never stingy with his grandchildern."

Bingham61

* Many thanks to TI list member Bruce Hettema, owner of P&H Creative Group, who sent me a huge package of old tearsheets from the early days of his studio, when it was known as Patterson & Hall, a San Francisco-based advertising art studio. Among those tearsheets were most of the images you see in todays post.

* Thanks also to Heritage Auctions for the scan of the WWII Defence poster in today's post.

Lime

Lime
When life gives you limes....paint them :)
Top: Watercolor sketch on paper.
Bottom: Mexican lime blossoms from our garden.

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Pope Alexander VI Rodrigo Lanzol Borja

It is reported, that some time before Borgia entered the conclave, in order to obtain cardinal Sforza's consent to his election, he sent four mules to his house, loaded with plate, under pretence of being kept there till the conclave was over, which silver Sforza had for his vote.

On the 2d day of August, 1492, the affair was brought to a conclusion, and cardinal Roderick, with the concurring votes of twenty-two cardinals, declared Pope,t by the name of Alexander the Sixth. As soon as he perceived the election determined in his favour, it is reported he expressed himself in these words:

"Am I then Pope the Vicar of Christ?" Sforza made answer, "Yes, holy father; and we hope by your election to give glory to God, repose to his church, and joy to Christendom; you being by the Almighty chosen as the most worthy of all your brethren." To which his holiness made answer: "We hope God will grant us his powerful assistance, notwithstanding of our weakness, being desirous to follow the dictates of the Holy Ghost, and with intrepidity to promulgate those holy laws already ratified in heaven. Although this is a great weight with which we are loaded, yet we hope the same assistance will be given us as it was to St. Peter, when the keys of heaven were put into his hands, and the helm of the church entrusted to his care,—too great a charge for mortal man without such divine assistance,—and yet God promised that his Spirit should direct him. Nor do we doubt but every one of yon will show that holy obedience due to the head of the church, in imitation of that which Christ's flock were obliged to give to the prince of the apostles."

Pope Alexander VI Rodrigo Lanzol BorjaPortrait of Pope Alexander VI. Painting located at Corridoio Vasariano (museum) in Florence (Firenze), Italy. Measures of painting: 59 x 44 cm. Artist: Cristofano dell'Altissimo (1525–1605) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

Title: The lives of Pope Alexander VI and his son Cæsar Borgia. Author: Alexander Gordon. Publisher: J. Campbell, 1844. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Apr 6, 2006. Length: 232 pages

This IMAGE (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 (in this circa 1565) are now in the public domain.

This file is also in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris) in this case Cristofano dell'Altissimo (1525–1605), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from December 31st of that year.

This was the substance of Pope Alexander's speech on his election; it was, however, observed he made an unusual haste in getting himself dressed in the pontifical habit, as if the consciousness of the simony, by which he obtained his new dignity, had made him afraid of losing it before all the formalities had passed; on this account he seemed to want his election might be known as soon as possible; and accordingly ordered small scrolls of paper, with his name as Pope written in Latin, to be thrown over the windows of the Vatican, amongst the people.

These, and some other vain-glorious circumstances of the like nature, began to be observed with surprise, which made cardinal Medici whisper in Lorenzo Cibo's ears these words: "My lord," says he, "we are betrayed into the hands of one of the most rapacious wolves that perhaps the world ever saw, from whom if we do not fly, he will infallibly devour us." Which prophecy was very soon verified to their sad experience.

No sooner was Alexander dressed in his pontifical habit, than he was carried to St. Peter's church, where the usual ceremonies were performed, and where multitudes came crowding to see the new Pope: from thence he was brought back to his apartments in the Vatican, where, when he arrived, he made another speech to the cardinal, in which he feigned a great deal of new zeal and sanctity, exhorting them to a reformation of their way of living, telling, that whoever amongst them had been guilty of avarice and simony, he was resolved to look into such conduct in a very impartial manner. By all which, he showed plainly that those cardinals with whom he had made the aforesaid stipulations for advancing him to the pontificate, had little to hope with regard to his performing the bargain: nay, it was very remarkable, that* all those mercenary cardinals, who were the chief instruments of his election, as a chastisement for their horrid simony, were some time after, the very persons singled out by Pope Alexander for ruin and death, as was seen in his barbarity and cruelty committed on Sforza, Riario, cardinal Michiele, and others, who sold their votes, as if it had been by auction.

Some of them were sent into exile,t others laid up in jail, and some put to the most cruel deaths. But this new and unexpected declaration, which we just now mentioned, struck no small terror into the minds of those cardinals who had been the authors of his promotion, and showed them plainly how expert their new Pope had been in all the arts of hypocrisyJ and deceit: in fine, it was a clear indication that the vengeance of heaven was at hand to punish their detestable crimes. On this, they thought of flying from him, but that they found difficult; to confess openly their faults, but that could help them nothing; to revoke his election, but it was too late, having themselves been the chief architects, who had laid the first corner-stone of that woful edifice.

TEXT CREDIT: The lives of Pope Alexander VI and his son Cæsar Borgia By Alexander Gordon

Tumbleweed

Look what the wind brought inTumbleweed
Turbo's inspection
The wind brought us this beautiful tumbleweed this week
and of course Turbo had to inspect it :)
Weathered branch
I found this other branch a few months ago and it still sits on top of our cabinet.
Did you know some people even collect them and you can buy them online!?

The Impactful Art of James R. Bingham

If I could use only one word to describe the work of James R. Bingham, it would be this:

Bingham49.detail01

"Impactful."

Bingham49

Bingham had the innate ability to take any scene, from the most benign...

Bingham25.detail01.jpg

... to the most ferocious...

Bingham27.detail.jpg

... and give to it a sense of drama that transcended the work of most other illustrators.

Bingham09.detail01.JPG

That's because James R. Bingham could do so much more than just draw and paint well. Bingham had a masterful understanding of all the elements that make up a great picture. It takes more than the ability to render well; a great picture must have great lighting, staging, and colour.

Bingham25.detail02.jpg

Bingham may have considered himself an illustrator...

Bingham20.jpg

... but I believe he was, at heart, a designer. Bingham's attention to the essential elements of composition...

Bingham11.detail01.JPG

... his thoughtful choice of colour palette...

Bingham45

... his conscious decision to employ strong silhouetted shapes and to arrange them as effectively as possible...

Bingham29.detail.jpg

... his love of dramatic lighting and contrasting values...

Bingham47.detail01

... all speak to the kind of picture making one expects from the best designer/illustrators; the Rockwells, the Leyendeckers, and the Pyles.

Bingham.set.jpg

Great design is the key to great illustration - but its something many artists often overlook because they are caught up in the pleasing (and perhaps challenging) act of rendering forms in pencil or paint. Bingham understood the importance of design and always employed it to great effect.

Bingham23.jpg

This week, let's take another look at the always impactful art of James R. Bingham!

Bingham21.detail01.jpg

* This week's subject is a result of my having recently received a wonderful gift in the mail. TI list member Bruce Hettema, owner of P&H Creative Group, sent me a huge package of old tearsheets from the early days of his studio, when it was known as Patterson & Hall, a San Francisco-based advertising art studio. Among those tearsheets was the image at the very top of today's post -- and many more that I'll be presenting this week will also come from that pile. So many thanks, Bruce, for sharing this treasure trove of wonderful artwork with me and the rest of the TI readers!