Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Little Bloom

Little bloom
Little bloom stamp
I carved a little stamp this morning.
The pink rubber material is called Speedy Carve and it's made by Speedball.

More Female Illustrators You Should Know

Mary Blair

Widely acknowledged as one of the most influential illustrator/designers during the heyday of Disney's 'classic animation' era, Mary Blair's work continues to influence and inspire thousands of artists around the world to this day.

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Margaret Erath

Primarily a textile designer (and later a fine artist) she made a brief foray into illustration during her early career in New York. These two delightful album covers - and a few others long lost to time - may be the only actual illustrations Erath ever created.

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Lorraine Fox

Born in Brooklyn, a graduate of the Pratt Institute, Fox began illustrating for magazines in the second half of the 1940s. During an era when literal realism in illustration was king, Fox successfully pioneered a distinctive, stylized alternative - and she did it from the very heart of what was then the most influential commercial art enclave of the day, the Charles E. Cooper studio, which she joined in 1951.

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Gyo Fujikawa

A California native, Fujikawa worked for Disney before moving into advertising, editorial and children's book illustration.

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Over her long career she wrote and drew nearly fifty children's books that sold in total over a million copies.

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Mia Carpenter

Another west coast artist, Carpenter moved to New York after graduating from Art Center, where she had studied fashion illustration with Jack Potter.

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Retail fashion was a major component of her work - but she also did illustrations for editorial clients. Later, she did sketch art for entertainment ad agencies until her retirement in 2004.

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* Tomorrow (Wednesday) evening I'll be at The Nook talking about these and other Female Illustrators of the Mid-20th Century.

Monday, February 6, 2012

Civil rights march on Washington, D.C.

Civil rights march on Washington, D.C. Title: Civil rights march on Wash[ington], D.C. / [WKL]. Creator(s): Leffler, Warren K., photographer. Date Created / Published: 1963 Aug. 28. Medium: 1 negative : film.

Summary: Photograph shows a crowd of African Americans and whites surrounding the Reflecting Pool and continuing to the Washington Monument. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-03130 (digital file from original)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LC-U9- 10363-5 [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Notes: Title from contact sheet folder caption. U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection. Contact sheet available for reference purposes: USN&WR COLL - Job no. 10363, frame 5.

Subjects: African Americans--Civil rights--Washington (D.C.)--1960-1970. March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Washington, D.C., 1963. Civil rights demonstrations--Washington (D.C.)--1960-1970. Format: Film negatives--1960-1970.

Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand

Civil rights march on Washington, D.C.

Unedited Image: JPEG (36kb) || JPEG (89kb) || TIFF (11.0mb)

On August 28, 1963, more than 250,000 demonstrators descended upon the nation’s capital to participate in the “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.” Not only was it the largest demonstration for human rights in United States history, but it also occasioned a rare display of unity among the various civil rights organizations. The event began with a rally at the Washington Monument featuring several celebrities and musicians. Participants then marched the mile-long National Mall to the Memorial. The three-hour long program at the Lincoln Memorial included speeches from prominent civil rights and religious leaders. The day ended with a meeting between the march leaders and President John F. Kennedy at the White House.

TEXT RESOURCE: www.ourdocuments.gov/

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Female Illustrators You Should Know

Sheilah Beckett

She was one of the elite team of illustrators at the most prestigious art studio in America, The Charles E. Cooper studio.

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This wonderful artist and remarkable woman is still going strong at 99 years of age!

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Barbara Bradley

Barbara came to New York with the single-minded goal of getting a job at the best studio in America... and she succeeded.

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Years later she became the tough but much loved teacher and ultimately, Director of Illustration at The Academy of Art University in San Francisco.

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Naiad Einsel (With husband, Walter)

She worked for CBS. He worked for NBC. They fell in love and created a perfect union - two people whose styles were so similar that when they collaborated it became hard to tell who had done what.

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Together they produced an endless stream of delightful images for every major publication and many national advertisers, as well as record albums and books.

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Lucia Larner

Described by those who worked with and admired her as "the Queen" of powerhouse Chicago ad art studio, Stephens, Biondi, DiCicco.

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A single mother in an era when such a thing was far from normal, Lucia, who had the only private office/studio of all the artists on staff at SBD, commanded top dollar for her work on some of the biggest national accounts in America.

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Evaline Ness

Ex-wife of the famous FBI investigator Elliot Ness, "Eness" as she signed her work, had begun her career as a fashion model, then became a fashion illustrator.

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Over time she branched out into advertising, editorial and children's book illustration.

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Alice Provensen

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With husband Martin, she created one of America's most memorable and beloved advertising icons, Tony the Tiger...

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... and dramatically influenced the look of children's book illustration for the next generation of artists and readers.

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Today, there are just as many women illustrators as men (perhaps even more). But it wasn't always so. These remarkable ladies were very much in the minority during the heyday of their careers. They are female illustrators you should know. This Wednesday evening I'll be at The Nook talking about these and other Female Illustrators of the Mid-20th Century.

Sunday, February 5, 2012

George Washington Carver and staff members at the Tuskegee Institute

Title: [George Washington Carver, full-length portrait, seated on steps, facing front, with staff] Creator(s): Johnston, Frances Benjamin, 1864-1952, photographer. Date Created / Published: [ca. 1902]

Medium: 1 photographic print. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-05633 (digital file from modern print)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LOT 13164-C, no. 103 [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Notes: Title devised by Library staff. Reference copy (modern print) in BIOG FILE - Carver, George Washington.

Forms part of: Booker T. Washington Collection (Library of Congress). Original negative may be available: LC-J694-159. Subjects: Carver, George Washington,--1864?-1943. Format: Group portraits--1900-1910. Photographic prints--1900-1910. Portrait photographs--1900-1910.

Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand. Part of: Visual materials from the Booker T. Washington papers.

George Washington Carver was born a slave in Diamond Grove, Missouri, around 1864. He is one of the nation's most famous agricultural scientists. He is best known for his research on peanuts and his commitment to helping poor Southern African American farmers.

George Washington Carver and staff members at the Tuskegee Institute

Unedited Image: JPEG (68kb) || JPEG (148kb) || TIFF (28.8mb)

George Washington Carver (front row, center) poses with fellow staff members at the Tuskegee Institute (now known as Tuskegee University) Alabama.

Carver worked at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama for most of his adult life. In 1943, soon after Carver's death, President Franklin D. Roosevelt made Carver's boyhood home a national monument. It was the first national monument to honor an African American.

Tractatus de Herbis

Codex Sloane 4016 is a 15th century Italian parchment manuscript belonging to a class of books known as herbals. These medicinal treatises recorded knowledge accumulated in the oral tradition about plants believed to possess therapeutic properties. See: one, two, three.



Miniature of plants and a demon - the herb Ypericon, supposed to repell demons - (Tractatus de Herbis - Sloane 4016   f. 103)
Miniature of plants and a demon - the herb Ypericon, supposed to repel demons



Manuscript miniature of fruit picking
Miniature of a plant and boys standing in the branches of a fruit tree
picking fruit and throwing down to a woman standing below



Miniature of a tree, a spider web, and an eagle - (Tractatus de Herbis - Sloane 4016   f. 6)
Miniature of a tree, a spider web, and an eagle



Miniature of plants, including a mandrake plant with a naked male body as the root - (Tractatus de Herbis - Sloane 4016   f. 56v)
Miniature of plants, including a mandrake plant with a naked male body as the root



Miniatures of plants, and a cat and mouse - (Tractatus de Herbis - Sloane 4016   f. 40)
Miniatures of plants, and a cat and mouse



15th c bestiary & herbal - animal sketches
Miniature of a lion, a leopard, a rabbit, and an elephant



Medieval manuscript bestiary & herbal and map
Miniatures of plants, a braying donkey, and a map



Medieval herbal and bestiary
Miniatures of plants, crabs, and [most likely] a lobster-like animal [versus a scorpion as captioned at the source site] (thanks ogerard)



Miniatures of a tree and a snake - (Tractatus de Herbis - Sloane 4016   f. 65v)
Miniatures of a tree and a snake



Herbal/bestiary from 1400s
Miniatures of a plant and a bird, holding a horseshoe in its mouth



Medieval manuscript : herbal & bestiary
Miniature of a plant, a cricket, a crane, and a salamander



Miniature of a tree and an animal castrating itself - (Tractatus de Herbis - Sloane 4016   f. 28)
Miniature of a tree and an animal castrating itself


Produced in Lombardy in Northern Italy in 1440, 'Tractatus de Herbis' consists of over two hundred beautifully illustrated pages accompanied by Latin commentary in a Gothic script.

The whole manuscript (Sloane 4016) is accessible online from the British Library; including enlarged detail images.

A facsimile edition of 'Tractatus de Herbis' is available from the Spanish manuscript reproduction firm of M Moleiro.

VIA: Medieval & Earlier Manuscripts Blog | Miniaturaitaliana.

Previously: flora/medieval.

L-O-V-E

Rain or Shine
Heart Frames
Visit Jan's Poppytalk blog tomorrow
for a little DIY gift of love from me to you :-)

Saturday, February 4, 2012

Benjamin Oliver Davis Jr. Tuskegee Airmen

Benjamin Oliver Davis Jr. (December 18, 1912 – July 4, 2002) commander of Tuskegee Airmen 332nd Fighter Group and Edward C. Gleed of Lawrence, KS, Class 42-K, Group Operations Officer.

Title: [Col. Benjamin O. Davis, full-length portrait, and Edward C. Gleed, wearing flight gear, standing next to airplane, and looking upward, at air base at Rametti, Italy] Creator(s): Frissell, Toni, 1907-1988, photographer. Date Created / Published: [1945 March]
Medium: 1 photographic print.

Summary: Photograph shows (left) Col. Benjamin O. Davis, Commanding Officer, 332nd Fighter Group, Class 42-C; (right) Edward C. Gleed, Lawrence, KS, Class 42-K, Group Operations Officer. P-5/D in background, "Creamer's Dream," generally flown by Charles L. White, St. Louis MO, Class 44-C Ramitelli, Italy, March 1945. (Source: Tuskegee Airmen 332nd Fighter Group pilots.)

Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-11759 (digital file from original neg.) LC-USZ6-2259 (b&w film copy neg.) LC-F9-02-4503-330-4 (b&w film neg.)

Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Call Number: LOT 12447-1 [item] [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. Notes: Frame ET 330-4 of contact sheet. Toni Frissell Collection (Library of Congress). Copyright by Toni Frissell.

Subjects: Davis, Benjamin O.-- (Benjamin Oliver), -- 1912-2002 -- Military service. United States. -- Army Air Forces. -- Fighter Group, 332nd -- People. Fighter pilots -- American -- Italy -- 1940-1950.

Benjamin Oliver Davis Jr. Tuskegee Airmen

Format: Group portraits--1940-1950. Photographic prints--1940-1950. Portrait photographs--1940-1950. Collections: Miscellaneous Items in High Demand.

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20 Years Ago

Me 20 years ago...
I found some old black & white negatives yesterday
while looking for something else entirely. I had never seen this photo
and I don't even know who took it. I was 24 yrs old.

Friday, February 3, 2012

John Carter and Dejah Thoris

The morning of our departure for Thark dawned clear and hot, as do all Martian mornings except for the six weeks when the snow melts at the poles.

I sought out Dejah Thoris in the throng of departing chariots, but she turned her shoulder to me, and I could see the red blood mount to her cheek. With the foolish inconsistency of love I held my peace when I might have plead ignorance of the nature of my offense, or at least the gravity of it, and so have effected, at worst, a half conciliation.

My duty dictated that I must see that she was comfortable, and so I glanced into her chariot and rearranged her silks and furs. In doing so I noted with horror that she was heavily chained by one ankle to the side of the vehicle.

"What does this mean?" I cried, turning to Sola.

"Sarkoja thought it best," she answered, her face betokening her disapproval of the procedure.

Examining the manacles I saw that they fastened with a massive spring lock.

"Where is the key, Sola? Let me have it."

"Sarkoja wears it, John Carter," she answered.

I turned without further word and sought out Tars Tarkas, to whom I vehemently objected to the unnecessary humiliations and cruelties, as they seemed to my lover's eyes, that were being heaped upon Dejah Thoris.

"John Carter," he answered, "if ever you and Dejah Thoris escape the Tharks it will be upon this journey. We know that you will not go without her. You have shown yourself a mighty fighter, and we do not wish to manacle you, so we hold you both in the easiest way that will yet ensure security. I have spoken."

John Carter and Dejah Thoris

This Image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the United States, where Works published prior to 1978 were copyright protected for a maximum of 75 years. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" PDF from the U.S. Copyright Office. Works published before 1923 in this case 1917, are now in the public domain.

This inage however MAY NOT be in the public domain in countries that figure copyright from the date of death of the artist (post mortem auctoris), in this case Frank Earle Schoonover (August 19, 1877 - Aug 1972), and that most commonly runs for a period of 50 to 70 years from that date. It may be copyrighted in jurisdictions that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works. If your use will be outside the United States please check your local law.

TEXT and IMAGE CREDIT: A Princess of Mars Author: Edgar Rice Burroughs. Edition: illustrated by: Frank Earle Schoonover (August 19, 1877 - Aug 1972). Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap, 1917. Original from: Harvard University. Digitized: Sep 27, 2005. Length: 326 pages. Subjects: Fiction › Science Fiction › General.

Alegria!

Alegria fabric line for Cloud9Fabrics
Michelle sent me the first strike-offs
from the Alegria line for Cloud9 Fabrics this week.
It's so wonderful to see my birdies on fabric.
Now I just need lots of patience until they're available this Spring!

A Few More by Bowler

The announcement of Brian Neher's free online art contest, which is beginning next week, and Joe Bowler's donation toward the grand prize, got me digging through my old magazine collection once again for more examples of Bowler's fantastic artwork.

I haven't had much time this week to post, but I hate to leave you to get through the weekend with no new mid-century artwork to inspire you. So here are a few more pieces by Bowler. I find it fascinating to see the artist's stylistic development in a compressed format like this. Below, Joe Bowler from Cosmopolitan magazine, 1951...

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... from the Saturday Evening Post, 1959...

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... and from Woman's Day, 1962. In each piece you can see Bowler getting looser, rougher, and more energetic with his technique...

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... until one could almost imagine that Bowler's rough sketch from the early '50s might have looked like the finished art from the early sixties!

Finally, below, an actual Joe Bowler "sketch/study" for an illustration, found at the Heritage Auctions website. (This last, incidentally, is currently open for bidding)

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Have a great weekend - and don't forget, I'll be at The Nook next Wednesday evening talking about Female Illustrators of the Mid-20th Century